Bamboo Pit Viper

Bamboo Pit Viper

Indian green pit viper, Common green pit viper, Indian tree viper, Bamboo snake, Indian green tree viper, Green tree viper, Bamboo viper, Bamboo pitviper, Boodro pam, Grass-green snake, Green pit viper

Kingdom
Phylum
Subphylum
Class
Order
Suborder
Family
Genus
SPECIES
Trimeresurus gramineus
Population size
Unknown
LENGTH
up to 99 cm

The Bamboo pit viper is a venomous pit viper species found in the southern part of India. These snakes are usually bright green, rarely yellowish, greyish, or purplish-brown in color, with or without black, brown, or reddish spots. There is usually a light, white, yellow, or red streak along the outer row of scales. Their tail is frequently yellow or red in the end. Lower parts of the body are green, yellow, or whitish in color.

Distribution

Bamboo pit vipers are native to India. The range of this species has been restricted to southern India especially widespread in a large area of Tamil Nadu. These snakes are also very rarely seen near Harishchandragad and some other mountain ranges of Western Ghats (Sahyadris in Maharashtra). They are also found albeit very scarcely in the eastern region of India spanning from Odisha, Jharkhand, and West Bengal. Bamboo pit vipers inhabit bamboo groves and forests, usually near streams. They can also be found in dry scrub forest.

Bamboo Pit Viper habitat map

Geography

Continents
Subcontinents
Countries

Climate zones

Habits and Lifestyle

Bamboo pit vipers are arboreal slow moving snakes. They are active at night. Like most snakes, Bamboo pit vipers are solitary creatures and come together only to mate. Although being slow, these snakes defend themselves with fast strikes and bites if threatened or injured. When feeling danger they often vibrate their tail.

Diet and Nutrition

Bamboo pit vipers are carnivores that feed on small rodents, birds, frogs, and lizards.

Mating Habits

BABY CARRYING
6-11 young
INDEPENDENT AGE
at birth
FEMALE NAME
female
MALE NAME
male
BABY NAME
snakelet

Little is known about the mating habits in Bamboo pit vipers. They are ovoviviparous which means that the eggs are incubated inside the mother and she gives birth to live snakelets. Female Bamboo pit vipers give birth to 6 to 11 young, which measure up to 4.5 in (110 mm) in length. Snakelets are born fully-developed and have to take care of themselves. The young have brightly marked tails which they use to attract small frogs and lizards in order to easier hunt them.

Population

Population threats

There are no major threats to Bamboo pit vipers. However, in some parts of their habitat, they do suffer from habitat loss due to mining, and degradation because of tourism.

Population number

According to IUCN, the Bamboo pit viper is locally common throughout its range but no overall population estimate is available. Currently, this species is classified as Least Concern (LC) on the IUCN Red List and its numbers today are stable.

References

1. Bamboo Pit Viper on Wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trimeresurus_gramineus
2. Bamboo Pit Viper on The IUCN Red List site - https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/178245/1528655

More Fascinating Animals to Learn About