Gee's Golden Langur

Gee's Golden Langur

Golden langur

Kingdom
Phylum
Subphylum
Class
Order
Suborder
Infraorder
SPECIES
Trachypithecus geei
Population size
5,500
WEIGHT
9-12 kg
LENGTH
50-75 cm

The Gee's golden langur belongs to the Old World monkey family and is one of the most endangered primate species of India. Long considered sacred by many Himalayan people, Golden langurs were first brought to the attention of the western world by the naturalist E. P. Gee in the 1950s. These monkeys have a black face and a very long tail. Their coat ranges from cream to golden; on the flanks and chest the hairs are darker and often rust coloured. The coats of the juveniles and females are lighter, silvery white to light buff.

Video

Distribution

Gee's golden langurs are found in a small region of western Assam, India and in the neighboring foothills of the Black Mountains of Bhutan. These monkeys live in tropical moist forests.

Gee's Golden Langur habitat map

Geography

Continents
Subcontinents
Countries

Climate zones

Habits and Lifestyle

Gee's golden langurs are arboreal and diurnal creatures. They prefer to forage early in the morning and afternoon, resting during the heat of midday. They spend most of their time in the canopy of trees and rarely come down to the ground. Gee's golden langurs are social and generally live in troops of about 8 (but sometimes up to 50) with several females to each adult male. Little is known about the social habits of these monkeys within the group, however, it has been noted that social grooming is a very important group activity. This way they strengthen the bonds between members of their group.

Seasonal behavior

Diet and Nutrition

Gee's golden langurs are herbivorous (frugivorous, folivorous) animals. Their diet consists of ripe and unripe fruits, mature and young leaves, seeds, buds and flowers.

Mating Habits

REPRODUCTION SEASON
year-round
PREGNANCY DURATION
6 months
BABY CARRYING
1 infant
FEMALE NAME
female
MALE NAME
male
BABY NAME
infant

Lilttel is known about the mating system in Gee's golden langurs. Their breeding season takes place at any time of the year. Females give birth to a single infant after a gestation period of around 6 months. Feeding and all of the care for the infant is provided by the mother and other females in the troop.

Population

Population threats

Habitat destruction is the main threat to Gee's golden langurs due to illegal encroachment and woodcutting. These monkeys also suffer from harvesting of non-woody vegetation for firewood and charcoal production, selective logging, timber collection, human settlement, deforestation, fragmentation, trade, domestic dogs, high juvenile mortality, inbreeding, and local trade as pets and in road shows.

Population number

According to the IUCN Red List, the total population size of Gee's golden langurs is 5,500 individuals with less than 2,500 mature individuals globally. There are less than 1,500 individuals in India and around 4,000 individuals in Bhutan. Overall, this species’ numbers are decreasing and it is currently classified as Endangered (EN) on the IUCN Red List.

References

1. Gee's Golden Langur on Wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gee%27s_golden_langur
2. Gee's Golden Langur on The IUCN Red List site - https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/22037/9348940

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