Tasmanian Pademelon

Tasmanian Pademelon

Rufous-bellied pademelon, Red-bellied pademelon

Kingdom
Phylum
Subphylum
Class
Infraclass
Family
Genus
SPECIES
Thylogale billardierii
Population size
Unknown
Life Span
5-6 yrs
WEIGHT
4-12 kg
LENGTH
1-1.2 m

Tasmanian pademelons are short stocky marsupials. They have soft dark brown to grey brown fur on the back, and reddish brown or lighter brown fur on stomach. Tasmanian pademelons have a short tail and compact body. This is very useful for maneuvering through dense vegetation. The males in this species are larger than females.

Distribution

Tasmanian pademelons are found in Tasmania and were formerly found throughout south-eastern Australia. These animals inhabit areas of dense vegetation, rainforest, sclerophyll forest, and scrubland. They also prefer wet gullies in dry open eucalyptus forest.

Tasmanian Pademelon habitat map

Geography

Continents
Countries
Regions

Climate zones

Habits and Lifestyle

Tasmanian pademelons are solitary and nocturnal. They spend the daylight hours in thick vegetation. After dusk, the animals move onto open areas to feed, but rarely stray more than 100 metres from the forest edge. Tasmanian pademelons travel to a feeding spot each evening at dusk and in the morning they return to their homes. As many as 10 pademelons may come together for feeding but they scatter immediately when they sense danger.

Seasonal behavior

Diet and Nutrition

Tasmanian pademelons are herbivores. They feed on a wide variety of plants, herbs, green shoots, and grass. They also consume some nectar-bearing flowers.

Mating Habits

MATING BEHAVIOR
REPRODUCTION SEASON
early winter
PREGNANCY DURATION
30 days
BABY CARRYING
1 joey
INDEPENDENT AGE
8 months
FEMALE NAME
jill, roo
MALE NAME
jack, boomer
BABY NAME
joey

Tasmanian pademelons are polygynandrous (promiscuous). It means that both males and females have multiple mates. There is no specific breeding season, though 70% of pademelon births seem to occur around the beginning of winter. The gestation period lasts 30 days after which a single joey is born and makes its way into the pouch immediately. The newborn baby stays in the pouch for about 6 months and is weaned at around 8 months. Tasmanian pademelons become reproductively mature at 14-15 months of age.

Population

Population threats

There are no major threats to Tasmanian pademelons; howeve in parts of their range, these animals are considered to be a pest species of agricultural crops. Even so, they are abundant to the point of being culled occasionally (along with other wallabies) to reduce competition for grass with the farmed animals. Hunting of the Tasmanian pademelon is allowed, its pelt having some economic value and its meat being palatable.

Population number

The IUCN Red List and other sources do not provide the Tasmanian pademelon total population size, but this animal is common and abundant throughout its known range. Currently, this species is classified as Least Concern (LC) on the IUCN Red List and its numbers today are stable.

References

1. Tasmanian Pademelon on Wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tasmanian_pademelon
2. Tasmanian Pademelon on The IUCN Red List site - https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/40571/21958627

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