genus

Crenadactylus

7 species

The list of species of Crenadactylus genus

Crenadactylus, the clawless geckos, are named for their distinguishing feature, the absence of terminal claws on the digits. They are the only Australian members of Gekkonidae to lack claws, the endemic genus is also the smallest in size.

Prior to the reclassification of the Crenadactylus species, the population was recognised as occurring in a large distribution range that covered most of the western and central regions of Australia. The various species are found in habitat that includes the leaf-layer at the floor of woodlands, underneath rocks, in hummocks of Trioda vegetation in spinifex country, under logs and other dead woody litter, and beneath the rubbish piles introduced to their environment by human activity.

The newly described species were sometime recognised as occurring in restricted ranges, becoming isolated and specialised within particular environments. The small size is a limiting factor to the species ability to move beyond the local ecology, but may have allowed them to persist in the environment with less vulnerability to the continent's climatic changes.

This is a part of the Wikipedia article used under the Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). The full text of the article is here → https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crenadactylus 
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The list of species of Crenadactylus genus

Crenadactylus, the clawless geckos, are named for their distinguishing feature, the absence of terminal claws on the digits. They are the only Australian members of Gekkonidae to lack claws, the endemic genus is also the smallest in size.

Prior to the reclassification of the Crenadactylus species, the population was recognised as occurring in a large distribution range that covered most of the western and central regions of Australia. The various species are found in habitat that includes the leaf-layer at the floor of woodlands, underneath rocks, in hummocks of Trioda vegetation in spinifex country, under logs and other dead woody litter, and beneath the rubbish piles introduced to their environment by human activity.

The newly described species were sometime recognised as occurring in restricted ranges, becoming isolated and specialised within particular environments. The small size is a limiting factor to the species ability to move beyond the local ecology, but may have allowed them to persist in the environment with less vulnerability to the continent's climatic changes.

This is a part of the Wikipedia article used under the Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). The full text of the article is here → https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crenadactylus 
show less
Source