Egyptian pygmy shrew

Egyptian pygmy shrew

Egyptian pygmy shrew, Sacred shrew

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SPECIES
Crocidura religiosa

The Egyptian pygmy shrew or sacred shrew (Crocidura religiosa ) is a species of mammal in the family Soricidae. It is endemic to Egypt. Its natural habitat is arable land. It is threatened by habitat loss, partially caused by the construction of the Aswan Dam. They are 48–62 mm in length, making them one of the smallest shrews in Egypt. They weigh 7 grams.

Appearance

The Egyptian pygmy shrew has grey fur, tinged with brown on the upperparts and tipped with white on the paler underparts. The bristly tail is grey on top and white underneath and the feet are pale and almost hairless. It has small eyes, a pointed snout and a slightly flattened head which, along with its paler overall colour and proportionately longer tail, distinguishes it from other shrews found in Egypt.

Distribution

Geography

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Egyptian pygmy shrew habitat map
Egyptian pygmy shrew habitat map
Egyptian pygmy shrew
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Mating Habits

Like most shrews, it is a nocturnal animal, hiding during day in burrows and crevices. Its diet is mostly insectivorous. It is solitary and territorial. Female pygmy shrews give birth to litters of one to ten, hairless young with closed eyes. Their eyes open at 13 days and they are weaned at 20 days. The young reach sexual maturity at two to three months and live for 12 to 18 months.

References

1. Egyptian pygmy shrew Wikipedia article - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_pygmy_shrew
2. Egyptian pygmy shrew on The IUCN Red List site - https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/5616/114077410

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