Endemic Animals of Dominica








Imperial amazon
Imperial amazon
The imperial amazon or Dominican amazon, also known as the sisserou, is a parrot found only on the Caribbean island of Dominica. It has been designated as the national bird of Dominica. The species is critically endangered. In 2019, it was estimated there were only about 50 mature individuals left in the wild.
Discover more
Imperial amazon
Red-necked amazon
Red-necked amazon
The red-necked amazon, also known as the red-necked parrot, Dominican blue-faced amazon, lesser Dominican amazon, and Jaco parrot, is an amazon parrot endemic to Dominica. It is green, with bright splashes of various colours. Its name is due to the area of red plumage commonly found at its throat. The hypothetical Martinique amazon, known only from old descriptions, was said to look quite similar, and may have been a related . It was said to ...
occur on one major island to the south of Dominica.
Discover more
Red-necked amazon
Blue-headed hummingbird
Blue-headed hummingbird
The blue-headed hummingbird is a species of hummingbird in the family Trochilidae.
Discover more
Blue-headed hummingbird
Dominican ground lizard
Dominican ground lizard
The Dominican ground lizard or Dominican ameiva is a species of lizard. It is endemic to the Caribbean island of Dominica, an island noted for its intact and abundant reptile population, where it is most commonly found in dry coastal woodland. Adults are mostly blue-gray, and can reach lengths up to 400 mm from snout to tail. They are omnivorous, feeding on fallen fruit, carrion, and small animals including other lizards.
Discover more
Dominican ground lizard
Anolis oculatus
Anolis oculatus
Anolis oculatus, the Dominica anole, Dominican anole or eyed anole, is a species of anole lizard. It is endemic to the Caribbean island of Dominica, where it is found in most environments. The species is found in a diverse range of color forms, which one herpetologist once classified as four subspecies, which most other scientists did not recognise because the forms gradually inter-grade with one another. Two later researchers have instead ...
promoted the "ecotypes" concept, hypothesizing the color forms are maintained by the ecological conditions of the surrounding environment, despite being genetically indistinguishable. The morphology of some traits is subject to clinal variation, gradually changing from one side of the island to the other, or from sea level to the hilltops. The ground color ranges from pale tan or yellow to deep green or brown. It also has patterned markings that range from light-colored speckling to complex marbled patterns, and some populations also have large black-ringed "eye" spots on their flanks. The Dominican anole spends much of the time in trees but mainly hunts on the ground. Small insects make up the bulk of its prey, with soft-bodied invertebrates and small vertebrates hunted less frequently. Long-living and late maturing for anoles, the Dominican anole can usually breed from around two to three months of age. Females lay eggs, and breeding can occur at any time of year. Clutches number one or rarely two eggs and are laid under rocks or leaves on the ground. Although presently widespread and common on Dominica, in 2007 some authors opined that it may face competition from A. cristatellus, an anole from Puerto Rico, which was introduced a few years earlier.
Discover more
Anolis oculatus
Dominican blind snake
Dominican blind snake
The Dominican blind snake or Dominican worm snake is a species of blind snake that is endemic to the Caribbean island-nation of Dominica, in the Lesser Antilles.
Discover more
Dominican blind snake