Endemic Animals of Grenada








Grenada dove
Grenada dove
The Grenada dove is a medium-sized New World tropical dove. It is endemic to the island of Grenada in the Lesser Antilles. Originally known as the pea dove or Well's dove, it is the national bird of Grenada. It is considered to be one of the most critically endangered doves in the world .
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Grenada dove
Lesser Antillean tanager
Lesser Antillean tanager
The lesser Antillean tanager is a species of bird in the family Thraupidae. It is found in Grenada and Saint Vincent. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and heavily degraded former forest.
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Lesser Antillean tanager
Pristimantis euphronides
Pristimantis euphronides
Pristimantis euphronides is a species of frog in the family Craugastoridae. It is endemic to Grenada, an island in the Lesser Antilles, the Caribbean. Is sometimes known as the Grenada frog. It was originally described as a subspecies of Eleutherodactylus urichi, but since 1994 it has been recognized as a full species.
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Pristimantis euphronides
Corallus grenadensis
Corallus grenadensis
Corallus grenadensis, also known as the Grenada tree boa or Grenada Bank tree boa, is a non-venomous boa species found in Grenada. No subspecies are currently recognized.
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Corallus grenadensis
Bachia alleni
Bachia alleni
Bachia alleni is a species of lizard in the family Gymnophthalmidae. The species is endemic to the southern Caribbean.
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Bachia alleni
Hydrochoerus gaylordi
Hydrochoerus gaylordi
Hydrochoerus gaylordi is an extinct species of capybara that lived in Grenada. This species was found in 1991 by Ronald Singer and his colleagues. The species was named after Joseph Gaylord as an acknowledgment of Singer.
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Hydrochoerus gaylordi
Conus dominicanus
Conus dominicanus
Conus dominicanus, common name the Antilles cone, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails, cone shells or cones. These snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans.
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Conus dominicanus