Endemic Animals of India








Indian Giant Squirrel
Indian Giant Squirrel
Indian giant squirrel is one of the most cute and lovable squirrels around the globe. This animal exhibits 2 - 3 types of color pattern with shades of black, brown and deep red. The body of the rodent varies from deep red to brown with white patches on belly as well as dirty white or cream colored under-parts and forelimbs. The animal has pink lips and nose. Long hairs appear behind the mouth and nose of the rodent. The eyes are colored in ...
bright dark or light brown. The powerful and long tail is light brown with creamy white tip. Individuals of both sexes look alike, although females have three sets of mammae.
Discover more
Indian Giant Squirrel
Nilgiri Langur
Nilgiri Langur
Nilgiri langurs are primates that belong to an Old World monkey family. These animals have glossy black fur on their body and golden brown fur on their head. Females in this species have a white patch of fur on the inner thigh.
Discover more
Nilgiri Langur
Nilgiri Marten
Nilgiri Marten
The elusive Nilgiri marten is the only marten species found in India. They are deep brown from head to rump, with the forequarters being almost reddish. The bright throat ranges in color from yellow to orange. They are similar in appearance to the Yellow-throated marten but only larger and have a prominent frontal concavity.
Discover more
Nilgiri Marten
Nilgiri Tahr
Nilgiri Tahr
The Nilgiri tahr is an ungulate that lives high in the mountains of southern India. It has a stocky body with short, coarse fur and a bristly mane. Males are larger than females and of darker color when mature. Both sexes have curved horns, and adult males develop a light grey area on their backs, thus are called "saddlebacks".
Discover more
Nilgiri Tahr
Purple frog
Purple frog
The purple frog is a frog species belonging to the family Nasikabatrachidae. It can be found in the Western Ghats in India. Names in English that have been used for this species are purple frog, Indian purple frog, or pignose frog. Although the adult frog was formally described in October 2003, the taxon was recognized much earlier by its tadpole, which had been described in 1918.
Discover more
Purple frog
Grey junglefowl
Grey junglefowl
The grey junglefowl, also known as Sonnerat's junglefowl, is one of the wild ancestors of the domestic chicken together with the red junglefowl and other junglefowls. A gene from the grey junglefowl is responsible for the yellow pigment in the legs and different body parts of all the domestic chicken breeds. A more recent study revealed multiple grey junglefowl genomic regions introgressed the genome of the domestic chicken, with evidence of ...
some domestic chicken genes also found in the grey junglefowl. This species is endemic to India, and even today it is found mainly in peninsular India and towards the northern boundary. It will sometimes hybridize in the wild with the red junglefowl. It also hybridizes readily in captivity and sometimes with free-range domestic chickens kept in habitations close to forests. Both the grey junglefowl and red junglefowl diverged about 2.6 million years ago. The species epithet commemorates the French explorer Pierre Sonnerat. Local names include Komri in Rajasthan, Geera kur or Parda komri in Gondi, Jangli Murghi in Hindi, Raan kombdi in Marathi, Kattu Kozhi in Tamil and Malayalam, Kaadu koli in Kannada and Tella adavi kodi in Telugu.
Discover more
Grey junglefowl
Indian wild ass
Indian wild ass
The Indian wild ass, also called the Ghudkhur, Khur or Indian onager in the local Gujarati language, is a subspecies of the onager native to Southern Asia. It is currently listed as Near Threatened by IUCN. The previous census in 2009 estimated a population of 4,038 Indian wild asses. However, the population was still growing. In December 2014, the population was estimated at 4,451 individuals. As of 2015, the current Indian wild ass population ...
has decreased to less than 4800 individuals in and outside of the Wild Ass Wildlife Sanctuary of India. The population has risen by 37% since 2014, reveals data released by the Gujarat forest department. The population has reached 6,082, according to the census conducted in March 2020.
Discover more
Indian wild ass
Forest owlet
Forest owlet
The forest owlet is endemic to the forests of central India. It is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List since 2018, as the population is estimated at less than 1,000 mature individuals. It is threatened foremost by deforestation. It is a member of the typical owl family Strigidae, and was first described in 1873. As it was not sighted after 1884, it was considered extinct for many years. In 1997, it was rediscovered by Pamela Rasmussen. ...
Searches in the locality mentioned on the label of the last collected specimen failed, and it turned out that the specimen had been stolen from the British Museum by Richard Meinertzhagen and resubmitted with a label bearing false locality information.
Discover more
Forest owlet
Jerdon's courser
Jerdon's courser
Jerdon's courser is a nocturnal bird belonging to the pratincole and courser family Glareolidae endemic to India. The bird was discovered by the surgeon-naturalist Thomas C. Jerdon in 1848 but not seen again until its rediscovery in 1986. This courser is a restricted-range endemic found locally in India in the Eastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh. It is currently known only from the Sri Lankamalleswara Wildlife Sanctuary, where it inhabits sparse ...
scrub forest with patches of bare ground.
Discover more
Jerdon's courser
Himalayan quail
Himalayan quail
The Himalayan quail or mountain quail, is a medium-sized quail belonging to the pheasant family. It was last reported in 1876 and is feared extinct. This species was known from only 2 locations in the western Himalayas in Uttarakhand, north-west India. The last verifiable record was in 1876 near the hill station of Mussoorie.
Discover more
Himalayan quail
Malabar grey hornbill
Malabar grey hornbill
The Malabar grey hornbill is a hornbill endemic to the Western Ghats and associated hills of southern India. They have a large beak but lack the casque that is prominent in some other hornbill species. They are found mainly in dense forest and around rubber, arecanut or coffee plantations. They move around in pairs or small groups, feeding on figs and other forest fruits. Their loud cackling and laughing call makes them familiar to people living ...
in the region.
Discover more
Malabar grey hornbill
White-cheeked barbet
White-cheeked barbet
The white-cheeked barbet or small green barbet is a species of Asian barbet found in southern India. It is very similar to the more widespread brown-headed barbet, but this species has a distinctive supercilium and a broad white cheek stripe below the eye and is found in the forest areas of the Western Ghats, parts of the Eastern Ghats and adjoining hills. The brown-headed barbet has an orange eye-ring but the calls are very similar and the two ...
species occur together in some of the drier forests to the east of the Western Ghats. Like all other Asian barbets, they are mainly frugivorous, and use their bills to excavate nest cavities in trees.
Discover more
White-cheeked barbet
Namdapha flying squirrel
Namdapha flying squirrel
The Namdapha flying squirrel is an arboreal, nocturnal flying squirrel endemic to Arunachal Pradesh in northeast India, where it is known from a single specimen collected in Namdapha National Park in 1981. No population estimate is available for B. biswasi, but the known habitat is tall Mesua ferrea jungles, often on hill slopes in the catchment area of Dihing River in northeastern India.
Discover more
Namdapha flying squirrel
Indian spotted chevrotain
Indian spotted chevrotain
The Indian spotted chevrotain is a species of even-toed ungulate in the family Tragulidae. It is native to India and possibly Nepal. It lives in rainforests and is nocturnal. It has a body length of 57.5 cm with a 2.5 cm long tail length and weighs around 3 kg . This was earlier included under the name of Tragulus meminna, but studies on the systematics of the group have led to that name being restricted to the Sri Lankan spotted chevrotain.
Discover more
Indian spotted chevrotain
Flame-throated bulbul
Flame-throated bulbul
The flame-throated bulbul is a member of the bulbul family of passerine birds and the state bird of Goa. It is found only in the forests of the Western Ghats in southern India. Formerly included as a subspecies of Pycnonotus flaviventris it has since been elevated to the status of a full species. They are olive backed with yellow undersides, a triangular orange-red throat and a white iris that stands out against the contrasting black head. They ...
are usually seen foraging in groups in the forest canopy for berries and small insects. They have a call often with two or three tinkling notes that can sound similar to those produced by the red-whiskered bulbul. The species has been referred to by names in the past such as ruby-throated bulbul and black-headed bulbul, but these are ambiguous and could apply to other species such as Rubigula flaviventris and R. dispar.
Discover more
Flame-throated bulbul
Red-crowned roofed turtle
Red-crowned roofed turtle
The red-crowned roofed turtle or Bengal roof turtle is a species of freshwater turtle endemic to South Asia. It was the type species of its former genus Kachuga. Females can grow to a shell length of 56 cm and weigh 25 kilograms, but males are considerably smaller. The turtles like to bask in the sun on land. In the breeding season, the heads and necks of male turtles exhibit bright red, yellow and blue coloration. The females excavate nests in ...
which they lay clutches of up to thirty eggs. Historically, this turtle was found in central Nepal, northeastern India, Bangladesh and probably Burma, but it has suffered declines in population due to being harvested for meat and shells, drowned in fishing nets, water pollution, hydro-electric schemes and habitat loss. Fewer than four hundred adult females are thought to remain in the wild, with the International Union for Conservation of Nature rating this turtle as being "critically endangered". India has put conservation measures in place, and a captive breeding programme has been initiated.
Discover more
Red-crowned roofed turtle
Malabar gliding frog
Malabar gliding frog
The Malabar gliding frog or Malabar flying frog is a rhacophorid tree frog species found in the Western Ghats of India.
Discover more
Malabar gliding frog
Blue-winged parakeet
Blue-winged parakeet
The blue-winged parakeet, also known as the Malabar parakeet is a species of parakeet endemic to the Western Ghats of southern India. Found in small flocks, they fly rapidly in forest clearings while making screeching calls that differ from those of other parakeet species within their distribution range. Their long blue tails tipped in yellow and the dark wings with blue contrast with the dull grey of their head and body. Adult males and females ...
can be easily told apart from the colour of their beak.
Discover more
Blue-winged parakeet
Mottled wood owl
Mottled wood owl
The mottled wood owl is a species of large owl found in India. They are found in gardens and thin deciduous forests adjacent to dry thorn forests or farmland. They are easily detected by their distinctive tremulous eerie calls at dawn and dusk. The characteristic call is a duet of the male and female while other notes include a low hoot and a screech. Their large size, lack of "ear" tufts and the concentric barring on the face make them easy to ...
identify.
Discover more
Mottled wood owl
Brown palm civet
Brown palm civet
The brown palm civet also called the Jerdon's palm civet is a palm civet endemic to the Western Ghats of India.
Discover more
Brown palm civet
Narcondam hornbill
Narcondam hornbill
The Narcondam hornbill is a species of hornbill in the family Bucerotidae. It is endemic to the Indian island of Narcondam in the Andamans. Males and females have a distinct plumage. The Narcondam hornbill has the smallest home range out of all the species of Asian hornbills.
Discover more
Narcondam hornbill
Malabar whistling thrush
Malabar whistling thrush
The Malabar whistling thrush is a whistling thrush in the family Muscicapidae. They are also known locally by the name of whistling schoolboy for the whistling calls that they make at dawn that have a very human quality. The species is a resident in the Western Ghats and associated hills of peninsular India including central India and parts of the Eastern Ghats.
Discover more
Malabar whistling thrush
Bugun liocichla
Bugun liocichla
The Bugun liocichla is a passerine bird species from the family Leiothrichidae closely related to the Emei Shan liocichla. First spotted in 1995 in Arunachal Pradesh, India, it was described as a new species in 2006. The description was made without the collection of a type specimen as they were too few to risk killing one. It is thought to be an endangered species, with a small population, and a very restricted distribution range within which ...
commercial development threatens the habitat.
Discover more
Bugun liocichla
Red spurfowl
Red spurfowl
The red spurfowl is a member of the pheasant family and is endemic to India. It is a bird of forests, and is quite secretive despite its size. It has a distinctive call and is often hard to see except for a few seconds when it flushes from the undergrowth. It appears reddish and like a long-tailed partridge. The bare skin around the eye is reddish. The legs of both males and females have one or two spurs, which give them their name.
Discover more
Red spurfowl
Nicobar megapode
Nicobar megapode
The Nicobar megapode or Nicobar scrubfowl is a megapode found in some of the Nicobar Islands . Like other megapode relatives, it builds a large mound nest with soil and vegetation, with the eggs hatched by the heat produced by decomposition. Newly hatched chicks climb out of the loose soil of the mound and being fully feathered are capable of flight. The Nicobar Islands are on the edge of the distribution of megapodes, well separated from the ...
nearest ranges of other megapode species. Being restricted to small islands and threatened by hunting, the species is vulnerable to extinction. The 2004 tsunami is believed to have wiped out populations on some islands and reduced populations on several others.
Discover more
Nicobar megapode
Bare-bellied hedgehog
Bare-bellied hedgehog
The bare-bellied hedgehog, also known as the Madras hedgehog, is a species of hedgehog that is endemic to dry arid regions and scrubby jungles in southeastern India. As it was believed to be rare, it was formerly listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN. It is now known to be locally common in the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu, resulting in its new listing as a species of Least Concern. Hedgehogs are protected species under schedule IV ...
of Wildlife Protection Act .
Discover more
Bare-bellied hedgehog
Nilgiri wood pigeon
Nilgiri wood pigeon
The Nilgiri wood pigeon is large pigeon found in the moist deciduous forests and sholas of the Western Ghats in southwestern India. They are mainly frugivorous and forage in the canopy of dense hill forests. They are best identified in the field by their large size, dark colours and the distinctive checkerboard pattern on their nape.
Discover more
Nilgiri wood pigeon
Yellow-throated bulbul
Yellow-throated bulbul
The yellow-throated bulbul is a species of songbird in the bulbul family of passerine birds. It is endemic to southern peninsular India. They are found on scrub habitats on steep, rocky hills many of which are threatened by granite quarrying. It is confusable only with the white-browed bulbul with which its range overlaps but is distinctively yellow on the head and throat apart from the yellow vent. The calls of this species are very similar to ...
that of the white-browed bulbul.
Discover more
Yellow-throated bulbul
Green avadavat
Green avadavat
The green avadavat or green munia is a species of Estrildid finch with green and yellow on the body, a bright red bill and black "zebra stripes" on the flanks. They are endemic to the Indian subcontinent and were formerly popular as cagebirds. The name "avadavat" is a corruption of the name the city of Ahmedabad in Gujarat, India, which was a centre of bird trade. They have a restricted distribution and populations are threatened by the bird ...
trade.
Discover more
Green avadavat
White-bellied treepie
White-bellied treepie
The white-bellied treepie is a bird of the crow family endemic to the forests of southern India. They overlap in distribution in some areas with the rufous treepie but are easily to tell apart both from appearance and call.
Discover more
White-bellied treepie
Rufous babbler
Rufous babbler
The rufous babbler is an endemic species of bird found in the Western Ghats of southern India of the family Leiothrichidae It is dark brown and long tailed, and is usually seen foraging in noisy groups along open hillsides with a mixture of grass, bracken and forest.
Discover more
Rufous babbler
Nilgiri flycatcher
Nilgiri flycatcher
The Nilgiri flycatcher is an Old World flycatcher with a very restricted range in the hills of southern India. It was formerly referred to as the Nilgiri verditer flycatcher because of its similarity to the verditer flycatcher, a winter migrant to the Nilgiris, which, however, has distinct dark lores and a lighter shade of blue. There are two small white patches at the base of the tail. It is found mainly in the higher altitude shola forests of ...
the Western Ghats and the Nilgiris.
Discover more
Nilgiri flycatcher
Nilgiri pipit
Nilgiri pipit
The Nilgiri pipit is a distinctive species of pipit that is endemic to the high altitude hills of southern India. Richer brown in colour than other pipits in the region, it is distinctive in having the streaking on the breast continuing along the flanks. It is non-migratory and has a tendency to fly into low trees when disturbed and is closely related to the tree pipits Anthus hodgsoni and Anthus trivialis.
Discover more
Nilgiri pipit
Black-and-orange flycatcher
Black-and-orange flycatcher
The black-and-orange flycatcher or black-and-rufous flycatcher is a species of flycatcher endemic to the central and southern Western Ghats, the Nilgiris and Palni hill ranges in southern India. It is unique among the Ficedula flycatchers in having rufous coloration on its back and prior to molecular studies was suggested to be related to the chats and thrushes.
Discover more
Black-and-orange flycatcher
Manipur bush quail
Manipur bush quail
The Manipur bush quail is a species of quail found in northeastern India and Bangladesh inhabiting damp grassland, particularly stands of tall grass. It was first collected and described by Allan Octavian Hume on an ornithological expedition to Manipur in 1881.
Discover more
Manipur bush quail
Great Nicobar serpent eagle
Great Nicobar serpent eagle
The Great Nicobar serpent eagle, also known as the South Nicobar serpent eagle, is a species of bird of prey in the family Accipitridae. It is probably the smallest known eagle, with a weight of about 450 g, a wingspan of 85 to 95 cm and a body length of about 38 to 42 cm . It is endemic to forest on the Indian island of Great Nicobar. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Discover more
Great Nicobar serpent eagle
Nicobar parakeet
Nicobar parakeet
The Nicobar parakeet, also known as the Blyth's parakeet, is a parrot in the genus Psittacula, endemic to the Nicobar Islands of the Indian Ocean. It is one of the largest parakeets, measuring 56 to 60 cm from the top of the head to the tip of the tail and weighing about 224 g.
Discover more
Nicobar parakeet
Indian scimitar babbler
Indian scimitar babbler
The Indian scimitar babbler is an Old World babbler. It is found in peninsular India in a range of forest habitats. They are most often detected by their distinctive calls which include an antiphonal duet by a pair of birds. They are often hard to see as they forage through dense vegetation. The long curve yellow, scimitar-shaped bills give them their name. It has been treated in the past as subspecies of the white-browed scimitar babbler which ...
is found along the Himalayas but now separated into two species, the peninsular Indian species and the Sri Lanka scimitar babbler .
Discover more
Indian scimitar babbler
Andaman woodpecker
Andaman woodpecker
The Andaman woodpecker is a species of bird in the woodpecker family Picidae. It is endemic to the Andaman Islands in India. Its natural habitat is tropical moist lowland forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.
Discover more
Andaman woodpecker
Nilgiri flowerpecker
Nilgiri flowerpecker
The Nilgiri flowerpecker is a tiny bird in the flowerpecker family. Formerly a subspecies of what used to be termed as the plain flowerpecker although that name is now reserved for Dicaeum minullum. Like others of the group, it feeds predominantly on nectar and fruits. They forage within the canopy of forests and are found in India. They are non-migratory and the widespread distribution range includes several populations that are non-overlapping ...
and morphologically distinct, some of which are recognized as full species. They are important pollinators and dispersers of mistletoes in forests.
Discover more
Nilgiri flowerpecker
1 - 40 out of 364 LOAD MORE