Endemic Animals of Thailand








White-eyed river martin
White-eyed river martin
The white-eyed river martin is a passerine bird, one of only two members of the river martin subfamily of the swallows. Since it has significant differences from its closest relative, the African river martin, it is sometimes placed in its own genus, Eurochelidon. First found in 1968, it is known only from a single wintering site in Thailand, and may be extinct, since it has not been seen since 1980 despite targeted surveys in Thailand and ...
neighbouring Cambodia. It may possibly still breed in China or Southeast Asia, but a Chinese painting initially thought to depict this species was later reassessed as showing pratincoles. The adult white-eyed river martin is a medium-sized swallow, with mainly glossy greenish-black plumage, a white rump, and a tail which has two elongated slender central tail feathers, each widening to a racket-shape at the tip. It has a white eye ring and a broad, bright greenish-yellow bill. The sexes are similar in appearance, but the juvenile lacks the tail ornaments and is generally browner than the adult. Little is known of the behaviour or breeding habitat of this martin, although like other swallows it feeds on insects caught in flight, and its wide bill suggests that it may take relatively large species. It roosts in reed beds in winter, and may nest in river sandbanks, probably in April or May before the summer rains. It may have been overlooked prior to its discovery because it tended to feed at dawn or dusk rather than during the day. The martin's apparent demise may have been hastened by trapping, loss of habitat and the construction of dams. The winter swallow roosts at the only known location of this martin have greatly reduced in numbers, and birds breeding at river habitats have declined throughout the region. The white-eyed river martin is one of only two birds endemic to Thailand, and the country's government has noted this through the issues of a stamp and a high-value commemorative coin.
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White-eyed river martin
Siamese partridge
Siamese partridge
The Siamese partridge is a bird species in the family Phasianidae. It is found in highland forest in eastern Thailand. Some taxonomic authorities consider it to be a subspecies of the chestnut-headed partridge.
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Siamese partridge
Turquoise-throated barbet
Turquoise-throated barbet
The turquoise-throated barbet is an Asian barbet found in Thailand. The barbets get their name from the bristles which fringe their heavy bills; this species eats fruits and insects. It used to be considered a subspecies of the blue-throated barbet.
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Turquoise-throated barbet
Limnonectes megastomias
Limnonectes megastomias
Limnonectes megastomias is a species of frogs with fangs that was discovered in Thailand in 2008. The frog eats birds and insects. The male frogs use their fangs to attack other males in combat. The species have also been known to eat other frogs.
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Limnonectes megastomias
Chalcorana eschatia
Chalcorana eschatia
Chalcorana eschatia is a species of "true frog" in the family Ranidae. It is known from southern Thailand, but is likely to be more widespread. It was split off from Chalcorana chalconota by Robert Inger and colleagues in 2009, along with a number of other species in so-called "Rana chalconota group". The specific name eschatia, derived from the Greek word for "outskirt", refers to distribution of this species being at the edge of the ...
geographical range of the group.
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Chalcorana eschatia
Odorrana aureola
Odorrana aureola
Odorrana aureola, also known as the Phu Luang cliff frog or gold-flanked odorous frog, is a true frog species from northeastern Thailand. The specific name aureola is Latin and means ornamented with gold, in reference to the characteristic yellow markings on the limbs and flanks of this frog. It is notable for its ability to change color between green and brown, according to the surroundings.
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Odorrana aureola
Ichthyophis youngorum
Ichthyophis youngorum
Ichthyophis youngorum, the Doi Suthep caecilian, is a species of amphibian in the family Ichthyophiidae. It is known only from 10 adult and 13 larval specimens collected in 1957 by Edward Harrison Taylor. They were collected in the rainforest of Doi Suthep, near Chiang Mai, in Thailand, in a small valley at 1,200 m above sea level.
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Ichthyophis youngorum
Ansonia inthanon
Ansonia inthanon
Ansonia inthanon is a species of toad in the family Bufonidae.
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Ansonia inthanon
Ansonia siamensis
Ansonia siamensis
Ansonia siamensis is a species of toad in the family Bufonidae. It is endemic to the Khao Chong Mountains of peninsular Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and rivers.
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Ansonia siamensis
Pointed-headed caecilian
Pointed-headed caecilian
The pointed-headed caecilian, Ichthyophis acuminatus, is a species of amphibian in the family Ichthyophiidae endemic to Thailand. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical moist montane forests, rivers, intermittent rivers, plantations, rural gardens, heavily degraded former forest, irrigated land, and seasonally flooded agricultural land.
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Pointed-headed caecilian
Vietnamophryne occidentalis
Vietnamophryne occidentalis
Vietnamophryne occidentalis is a species of microhylid frog endemic to northern Thailand. Its type locality is Doi Tung Mountain, Chiang Rai Province, northern Thailand.
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Vietnamophryne occidentalis
Trimeresurus venustus
Trimeresurus venustus
Trimeresurus venustus is a venomous pitviper species endemic to southern Thailand. Its common names include beautiful pit viper and brown-spotted pit viper.
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Trimeresurus venustus
Trimeresurus kanburiensis
Trimeresurus kanburiensis
Trimeresurus kanburiensis is a species of pit viper found in only a few areas of Thailand. Common names include: Kanburi pitviper, Kanburian pit viper, and tiger pit viper. Highly venomous, it is an arboreal but heavily built species with a brown or tawny coloration. No subspecies are currently recognized.
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Trimeresurus kanburiensis
Acanthosaura phuketensis
Acanthosaura phuketensis
Acanthosaura phuketensis, the Phuket horned tree agamid, is a species of arboreal lizard native to Phuket Province, Thailand. It was discovered in 2015. It is now the 11th species in the genus Acanthosaura.
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Acanthosaura phuketensis
Boiga saengsomi
Boiga saengsomi
Boiga saengsomi is a species of snake in the family Colubridae. The species is endemic to Thailand.
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Boiga saengsomi
Alfred's blind skink
Alfred's blind skink
Alfred's blind skink, also known commonly as Alfred's dibamid lizard, Alfred's limbless skink, and Taylor's limbless skink, is a species of blind lizard in the family Dibamidae. The species is endemic to Southeast Asia.
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Alfred's blind skink
Boomsong's stream snake
Boomsong's stream snake
Boomsong's stream snake, also known as Boomsong's keelback and Boonsong's stream snake, is a species of snake in the family Colubridae, subfamily Natricinae . It is monotypic in the genus Isanophis. The species is endemic to Thailand.
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Boomsong's stream snake
Korat supple skink
Korat supple skink
The Korat supple skink or Koraten writhing skink is a species of skink in the family Scincidae. It is endemic to Thailand.
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Korat supple skink
Isopachys anguinoides
Isopachys anguinoides
Isopachys anguinoides, commonly known as the Thai snake skink or Heyer's isopachys, is a species of skink in the family Scincidae.
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Isopachys anguinoides
Sind River Snake
Sind River Snake
The Sind River snake is a species of mildly venomous, rear-fanged, colubrid snake. It is endemic to Thailand .
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Sind River Snake
Smith's mountain keelback
Smith's mountain keelback
Smith's mountain keelback, also known commonly as Spencer's stream snake, is a species of snake in the family Colubridae. The species is endemic to Thailand.
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Smith's mountain keelback
Gyldenstolpe's worm skink
Gyldenstolpe's worm skink
Gyldenstolpe's worm skink, Gyldenstolpe's isopachys, or Gyldenstolpe
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Gyldenstolpe's worm skink
Pseudocalotes khaonanensis
Pseudocalotes khaonanensis
Pseudocalotes khaonanensis is the largest agamid lizard in the genus Pseudocalotes. Endemic to Thailand, it is found only in the Khao Nan mountain range in, located in the Nakhon Si Thammarat Province of Southern Thailand. Found at high elevation in Cloud/Montane Forests in the stunted tree growth associated with this habitat, in trees rich with epiphyte growth.
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Pseudocalotes khaonanensis
Groundwater's keelback
Groundwater's keelback
Groundwater's keelback is a species of snake in the family Colubridae. The species is endemic to southern Thailand.
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Groundwater's keelback
Miriam's skink
Miriam's skink
Miriam's skink is a skink, a lizard in the family Scincidae. The species is endemic to Thailand.
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Miriam's skink
Narrow-tailed four-clawed gecko
Narrow-tailed four-clawed gecko
The narrow-tailed four-clawed gecko or narrowhead dtella is a species of gecko. It is endemic to eastern Thailand.
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Narrow-tailed four-clawed gecko
Butterfly forest gecko
Butterfly forest gecko
The butterfly forest gecko is a species of gecko endemic to Thailand.
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Butterfly forest gecko
Thirakhupt's bent-toed gecko
Thirakhupt's bent-toed gecko
Thirakhupt's bent-toed gecko is a species of gecko, a lizard in the family Gekkonidae. The species is endemic to Thailand.
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Thirakhupt's bent-toed gecko
Williamson's mouse-deer
Williamson's mouse-deer
Williamson's mouse-deer is a species of even-toed ungulate in the family Tragulidae. It is found in Thailand, and possibly in China.
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Williamson's mouse-deer
Nycticebus linglom
Nycticebus linglom
? Nycticebus linglom is a fossil strepsirrhine primate from the Miocene of Thailand. Known only from a single tooth, an upper third molar, it is thought to be related to the living slow lorises, but the material is not sufficient to assign the species to Nycticebus with certainty, and the species name therefore uses open nomenclature. With a width of 1.82 mm, this tooth is very small for a primate. It is triangular in shape, supported by a ...
single root, and shows three main cusps, in addition to various crests. The absence of a fourth cusp, the hypocone, distinguishes it from various other prosimian primates.
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Nycticebus linglom
Limestone rat
Limestone rat
The limestone rat is a species of rodent in the family Muridae found only in the limestone karsts of Saraburi, Lopburi, Nakhon Sawan provinces, central Thailand. It is listed as an endangered species due to its highly fragmented limestone karst habitat that is currently threatened by mining.
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Limestone rat
Bala tube-nosed bat
Bala tube-nosed bat
The Bala tube-nosed bat is a critically endangered species of bat found in Thailand.
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Bala tube-nosed bat
Hipposideros felix
Hipposideros felix
Hipposideros felix is a species of bat known from Miocene fossil deposits at Li Mae Long in Thailand. The holotype is a tooth, the third molar, of a hipposiderid bat with affinities to the Brachipposideros group of fossil species found in Australia and France. The first description was published in a study of mammal specimens at the fossil site that produced evidence of unknown species, including other bats. The species is only known from the Li ...
Mae Long, a site that was determined to be a forest near an open body of water in the Miocene. The authors, Léonard Ginsburg and Pierre Mein, proposed the specific epithet felix, derived from Latin, as a reference to the regions cultural perception of a bat as a symbol of happiness and good fortune.
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Hipposideros felix
Thongaree's disc-nosed bat
Thongaree's disc-nosed bat
Thongaree's disc-nosed bat is a critically endangered species of bat found in Thailand. It is the only member of the genus Eudiscoderma.
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Thongaree's disc-nosed bat
Idiosepius thailandicus
Idiosepius thailandicus
Idiosepius thailandicus is a species of bobtail squid native to the Indo-Pacific waters off Thailand. The extent of this species' distribution is still to be determined and records of Idiosepius dwarf squid away from Thailand, south to Indonesia and north to Japan, may be attributable to this species.
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Idiosepius thailandicus
Pygmaeconus visseri
Pygmaeconus visseri
Pygmaeconus visseri is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies. Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.
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Pygmaeconus visseri
Conasprella kantangana
Conasprella kantangana
Conasprella kantangana is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.
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Conasprella kantangana
Conus rawaiensis
Conus rawaiensis
Conus rawaiensis is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies. Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.
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Conus rawaiensis
Euprymna hyllebergi
Euprymna hyllebergi
Euprymna hyllebergi is a species of bobtail squid native to the eastern Indian Ocean, specifically the Andaman Sea off Thailand. It is known from depths to 74 m.
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Euprymna hyllebergi
Ithycythara apicodenticulata
Ithycythara apicodenticulata
Ithycythara apicodenticulata is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Mangeliidae.
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Ithycythara apicodenticulata