Endemic Animals of Baja California








Black Jackrabbit
Black Jackrabbit
The Black jackrabbit is a hare native to Mexico. The only known location of this species is in the Gulf of California on Espiritu Santo Island. These hares are mainly glossy black with a fine dark cinnamon grizzling on their backs, with their underside being predominantly dark cinnamon. They have heavily padded soles to their feet. Black jackrabbit females are typically larger than males, like other hares.
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Black Jackrabbit
Vaquita
Vaquita
Vaquitas are record-holders among all cetaceans. Thus, these animals are the smallest cetaceans, meanwhile being the smallest porpoises; they have the smallest range; and finally, Vaquitas are the most critically endangered cetacean species in the world. ‘Vaquita’ is a Spanish word meaning "little cow". The scientific name of this animal means “porpoise of the gulf”, as this cetacean is endemic to Mexico. Vaquitas are a quite recently discovered species ...
: they were first identified in 1958 based on skulls and were first observed in 1985.
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Vaquita
Crotalus catalinensis
Crotalus catalinensis
The Santa Catalina rattlesnake is a species of venomous pit viper endemic to Isla Santa Catalina in the Gulf of California just off the east coast of the state of Baja California Sur, Mexico. No subspecies are currently recognized. A relatively small and slender species, its most distinctive characteristic is that it lacks a rattle.
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Crotalus catalinensis
San Esteban chuckwalla
San Esteban chuckwalla
The San Esteban chuckwalla, also known as the piebald chuckwalla or pinto chuckwalla, is a species of chuckwalla belonging to the family Iguanidae endemic to San Esteban Island in the Gulf of California. It is the largest of the five species of chuckwallas, and the most threatened.
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San Esteban chuckwalla
Angel Island chuckwalla
Angel Island chuckwalla
The Angel Island chuckwalla, also known as the spiny chuckwalla, is a species of chuckwalla lizard belonging to the family Iguanidae endemic to Isla Ángel de la Guarda in the Gulf of California. The species was transported to other islands by a tribe of the Seri as a potential food source.
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Angel Island chuckwalla
Ctenosaura hemilopha
Ctenosaura hemilopha
Ctenosaura hemilopha, also known as the Baja California spiny-tailed iguana, is a species of spinytail iguana endemic to Baja California. It is arboreal and primarily herbivorous, although it can be an opportunistic carnivore. Males may grow up to 100 centimeters in length, while females are smaller, with a length of up to 70 centimeters . Five subspecies are currently recognized. The existence of mainland and insular populations of this species ...
has been valuable in providing biologists with study and control groups comparing the evolution of island populations and their mainland counterparts. The San Esteban Island subspecies coexists with the giant San Esteban chuckwalla, contrary to predictions of ecological niche theory.
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Ctenosaura hemilopha
Sauromalus slevini
Sauromalus slevini
Sauromalus slevini, also known as the Monserrat chuckwalla or Slevin's chuckwalla, is a species of chuckwalla belonging to the family Iguanidae. S. slevini is native to three small islands in the Sea of Cortés.
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Sauromalus slevini
Mearns's squirrel
Mearns's squirrel
Mearns's squirrel is a subspecies of the Douglas squirrel endemic to Mexico. It is endangered and occurs in low densities, and is threatened by habitat loss. It is possibly also threatened by competition from the eastern gray squirrel, which was introduced to the range of Mearns's squirrel in 1946, but may not be present anymore. It is closely related to other subspecies of the Douglas squirrel, but far less is known about its behavior, which ...
was first studied in detail in 2004. It is named for the 19th-century American naturalist Edgar Mearns.
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Mearns's squirrel
San José brush rabbit
San José brush rabbit
The San José brush rabbit is a critically endangered subspecies of the brush rabbit, in the family Leporidae.
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San José brush rabbit
Baja California rock squirrel
Baja California rock squirrel
The Baja California rock squirrel is a species of rodent in the family Sciuridae. It is endemic to Mexico.
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Baja California rock squirrel
Dickey's deer mouse
Dickey's deer mouse
Dickey's deer mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is endemic to Mexico, being found only on a small island in the Gulf of California. The species is named for Donald Dickey, who sponsored the expedition that first discovered the animal.
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Dickey's deer mouse
Burt's deer mouse
Burt's deer mouse
Burt's deer mouse is a species of rodent in the family Cricetidae. It is endemic to Mexico, where it is found only on Montserrat Island off the east coast of Baja California Sur. The species is threatened by predation by feral cats.
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Burt's deer mouse
Little desert pocket mouse
Little desert pocket mouse
The little desert pocket mouse is a species of small rodent in the family Heteromyidae. It is endemic to Baja California in Mexico.
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Little desert pocket mouse
Margarita Island kangaroo rat
Margarita Island kangaroo rat
The Margarita Island kangaroo rat is a subspecies of rodent in the family Heteromyidae.
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Margarita Island kangaroo rat
Dalquest's pocket mouse
Dalquest's pocket mouse
Dalquest's pocket mouse is a species of rodent in the family Heteromyidae, sometimes viewed as a subspecies of Chaetodipus ammophilus. It is endemic to Mexico. The pocket mouse is named after Walter W. Dalquest, an American zoologist associated with the American Museum of Natural History and Harvard's Museum of Comparative Zoology.
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Dalquest's pocket mouse
Conus dispar
Conus dispar
Conus dispar is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies. Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.
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Conus dispar