Endemic Animals of Bermuda








Bermuda petrel
Bermuda petrel
The Bermuda petrel is a gadfly petrel. Commonly known in Bermuda as the cahow, a name derived from its eerie cries, this nocturnal ground-nesting seabird is the national bird of Bermuda and can be found pictured on Bermudian currency. It is the second rarest seabird on the planet and a symbol of hope for nature conservation. They are known for their medium-sized body and long wings. The Bermuda petrel has a greyish-black crown and collar, dark ...
grey upper-wings and tail, white upper-tail coverts and white under-wings edged with black, and the underparts are completely white. For 300 years, it was thought to be extinct. The dramatic rediscovery in 1951 of eighteen nesting pairs made this a "Lazarus species", that is, a species found to be alive after having been considered extinct. This has inspired a book and two documentary films. A national programme to preserve the bird and restore the species has helped increase its numbers, but scientists are still working to enlarge its nesting habitat on the restored Nonsuch Island.
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Bermuda petrel
Bermuda rock skink
Bermuda rock skink
The Bermuda skink, longnose skink, or Bermuda rock lizard is a critically endangered species and the only endemic land-living vertebrate of Bermuda. It is a relatively small skink : adults reach an average snout-to-vent length of about 8 cm .
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Bermuda rock skink
Turbonilla heilprini
Turbonilla heilprini
Turbonilla heilprini is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Pyramidellidae, the pyrams and their allies.
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Turbonilla heilprini
Conus lightbourni
Conus lightbourni
Conus lightbourni is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies. Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.
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Conus lightbourni