Endemic Animals of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba








Red-bellied racer
Red-bellied racer
The red-bellied racer is a species of Colubrid snake that is endemic to the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean, where it is found on the islands of Saba, Sint Eustatius, Saint Kitts, and Nevis.
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Red-bellied racer
Anolis bimaculatus
Anolis bimaculatus
Anolis bimaculatus, the panther anole, also known as the St. Eustatius anole or Statia Bank tree anole, is a species of anole lizard that is endemic to the Caribbean Lesser Antilles. It is found on the St. Kitts Bank of islands, which comprise Saint Kitts, Nevis, and Sint Eustatius.
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Anolis bimaculatus
Saba least gecko
Saba least gecko
The Saba least gecko is a gecko endemic to the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean, where it can be found on Saba, Sint Eustatius, Saint Kitts, and Nevis.
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Saba least gecko
Cnemidophorus ruthveni
Cnemidophorus ruthveni
Cnemidophorus ruthveni is a species of teiid lizard endemic to Bonaire and commonly known as the Bonaire whiptail. It was formerly considered a subspecies of Cnemidophorus murinus, commonly known as Laurent's whiptail, but that name is now restricted to the form found on the island of Curacao.
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Cnemidophorus ruthveni
St. Christopher ameiva
St. Christopher ameiva
The St. Christopher ameiva is a lizard species in the genus Pholidoscelis. It is found on the Caribbean island of Sint Eustatius, and on Saint Kitts and Nevis, where it is more scarce.
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St. Christopher ameiva
Dutch leaf-toed gecko
Dutch leaf-toed gecko
The Dutch leaf-toed gecko is a species of lizard in the family Phyllodactylidae. The species is endemic to the Caribbean.
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Dutch leaf-toed gecko
Conus aurantius
Conus aurantius
Conus aurantius, common name the golden cone, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies. Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.
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Conus aurantius