Endemic Animals of Norfolk Island








Crimson rosella
Crimson rosella
The crimson rosella is a parrot native to eastern and south eastern Australia which has been introduced to New Zealand and Norfolk Island. It is commonly found in, but not restricted to, mountain forests and gardens. The species as it now stands has subsumed two former separate species, the yellow rosella and the Adelaide rosella. Molecular studies show one of the three red-coloured races, P. e. nigrescens, is genetically more distinct.
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Crimson rosella
White-chested white-eye
White-chested white-eye
The white-chested white-eye also known as white-breasted white-eye or Norfolk white-eye is a passerine from the family Zosteropidae. It is endemic to Norfolk Island between New Caledonia and New Zealand and it is regarded as either extremely rare or possibly extinct. Since 2000 the Australian government has considered the species extinct.
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White-chested white-eye
Norfolk robin
Norfolk robin
The Norfolk robin, also known as the Norfolk Island scarlet robin or Norfolk Island robin, is a small bird in the Australasian robin family Petroicidae. It is endemic to Norfolk Island, an Australian territory in the Tasman Sea, between Australia and New Zealand.
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Norfolk robin
Norfolk gerygone
Norfolk gerygone
The Norfolk gerygone is a species of bird in the family Acanthizidae. It is endemic to Norfolk Island.
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Norfolk gerygone
Christinus guentheri
Christinus guentheri
Christinus guentheri is a species of lizard in the family Gekkonidae . The species is endemic to two Australian islands, Norfolk Island and Lord Howe Island.
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Christinus guentheri
Lord Howe Island skink
Lord Howe Island skink
The Lord Howe Island skink is a part of the native Australian reptiles
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Lord Howe Island skink
Conasprella raoulensis
Conasprella raoulensis
Conasprella raoulensis is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies. Like all species within the genus Conasprella, these cone snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.
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Conasprella raoulensis