Endemic Animals of Queensland








Julia Creek Dunnart
Julia Creek Dunnart
The Julia Creek dunnart is a small marsupial that is nocturnal and carnivorous, and is the biggest of the genus Sminthopsis, 19 species of which are found in Australia. It almost became extinct before being discovered in the 1930s. It was rediscovered in 1992 after people thought it had been exterminated by invasive animals such as the domestic cat and the European fox. Populations have increased slightly since that time, as Australians have ...
begun killing stray cats.
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Julia Creek Dunnart
Mahogany Glider
Mahogany Glider
First described in 1883, these animals were considered subspecies of squirrel glider for about a century until 1989 when they were ‘rediscovered’ in the wild. Then, in 1993, the examination of skins and skulls of old and newly discovered specimens increased the level of this species. Mahogany gliders exhibit a thin gliding membrane, covered with fur and extending from their front feet to the ankle of their hind feet. This gliding membrane looks lik ...
e a wavy line, stretching along the animal's body when not in use. Their feet resemble hands in their form and shape. Meanwhile, the hind feet of these animals have enlarged, opposable big toes. The tail is long and densely covered with fur. Mahogany gliders use their tail to balance when gliding.
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Mahogany Glider
Bridled Nail-Tail Wallaby
Bridled Nail-Tail Wallaby
The Bridled nail-tail wallaby is called so due to the white ‘bridle’ band, stretching down from the center of the animal's neck on both sides behind the forearm as well as the horny nail-like point on the tip of the tail. Males, females and juveniles look alike. Being one of three nail-tail wallabies, the animal is currently one of two existing species of the genus. As other wallaby species, the Bridled nail-tail wallaby is hunched. The animal is ...
given the nickname 'flash jack' because of the muscular thighs and large hind legs, enabling the wallaby to hop very quickly. The overall coloration of the animal is generally grey; the feet, paws and tail are darker while the chest is lighter in color. The tail is long whereas the forearms are comparatively small and unspecialized with broad palms. On each leg, the animal has 5 digits, equipped with strong claws, which help the wallaby in grooming, opening the pouch or grabbing food.
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Bridled Nail-Tail Wallaby
Lumholtz's Tree-Kangaroo
Lumholtz's Tree-Kangaroo
Being the smallest tree-kangaroo, this animal is also the largest arboreal mammal, found in Australia, where it most commonly occurs in the rainforest canopy. By its appearance, the Lumholtz’s tree kangaroo greatly differs from other species of tree-kangaroo. The overall coloration of the animal's fur varies from pale grey to black and chestnut. The belly is cream colored, while the fore and hind paws are black. On its face, the animal exhibits a ...
black mask. The kangaroo has 5 digits on each forepaw, equipped with long, curved claws. On each of its hind paws, the animal displays a large fourth digit and medium fifth digit, but lacks hallux; the first and second digits are webbed, having two claws. On all of its paws, the kangaroo has fleshy pads with multiple tuberculations, or papillae, which help the animal grab arboreal surfaces.
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Lumholtz's Tree-Kangaroo
Mary River Turtle
Mary River Turtle
The Mary River turtle is an endangered short-necked turtle that is found only in Australia. It is one of Australia's largest turtles. Adults of this species have an elongated, streamlined carapace that can be plain in colour or intricately patterned. Overall colour can vary from rusty red to brown and almost black. The plastron varies from cream to pale pink. The skin colouration is similar to that of the shell and often has salmon pink present ...
on the tail and limbs. The iris can be pale blue.
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Mary River Turtle
Rankin's dragon
Rankin's dragon
Rankin's dragon is a species of Australian agamid lizard. It may also be called the pygmy bearded dragon and the black-soiled bearded dragon. The specific epithet, henrylawsoni, is in honor of the Australian author, poet, and philosopher Henry Lawson.
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Rankin's dragon
Morelia spilota cheynei
Morelia spilota cheynei
Morelia spilota cheynei, or the jungle carpet python, is a python subspecies found in the rainforests of Queensland, Australia.
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Morelia spilota cheynei
Kowari
Kowari
The kowari, also known by its Diyari name kariri, is a small carnivorous marsupial native to the gibber deserts of central Australia. It is monotypic; the sole member of genus Dasyuroides. Other names for the species include brush-tailed marsupial rat, bushy-tailed marsupial rat, kawiri, Kayer rat, and Byrne's crest-tailed marsupial rat.
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Kowari
Collett's snake
Collett's snake
Collett's snake, also commonly known as Collett's black snake, Collett's cobra, or Down's tiger snake, is a species of venomous snake in the family Elapidae. The species is native to Australia. Although Collett's snake is not as venomous as other Australian snakes, it is capable of delivering a fatal bite, ranking nineteenth in the world's most venomous snakes.
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Collett's snake
Menura tyawanoides
Menura tyawanoides
Menura tyawanoides is an extinct species of lyrebird from the Early Miocene of Australia. It was described by Walter Boles from fossil material found in terrestrial limestone at the Upper Site of Riversleigh, in the Boodjamulla National Park of north-western Queensland. It was smaller than the two living species of lyrebirds. The specific epithet comes from tyawan and the Greek suffix –oides .
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Menura tyawanoides
Kurrartapu
Kurrartapu
Kurrartapu johnnguyeni is an extinct species of bird in the Australian magpie and butcherbird family. It was described from Early Miocene material found at Riversleigh in north-western Queensland, Australia. It is the first Tertiary record of a cracticid from Australia. The size of the fossil material indicates that it was similar in size to the living black butcherbird. The generic name is a Kalkatungu language term for the Australian magpie. ...
The specific epithet honours John Nguyen, the father of the senior describer.
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Kurrartapu
Ciconia louisebolesae
Ciconia louisebolesae
Ciconia louisebolesae is an extinct species of stork from the Early Miocene of Australia. It was described by Walter Boles from fossil material found in a cave deposit at the Bitesantennary Site of Riversleigh, in the Boodjamulla National Park of north-western Queensland. The specific epithet refers to Louise Boles, the describer's mother, to whom the description is dedicated.
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Ciconia louisebolesae
Opalton grasswren
Opalton grasswren
The Opalton grasswren is an insectivorous bird in the family Maluridae. It is found in the Forsyth Range, . Formerly considered a sub-species of the Striated Grasswren, then known as the Rusty Grasswren. It is found around the opal mining area of Opalton and Lark Quarry south of Winton, Western Queensland. It was named as a full species by the I.O.C. in July 2020.
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Opalton grasswren
Capricorn silvereye
Capricorn silvereye
The Capricorn silvereye, also known as the Capricorn white-eye or green-headed white-eye, is a small greenish bird in the Zosteropidae or white-eye family. It is a subspecies of the silvereye that occurs on islands off the coast of Queensland in north-eastern Australia, and which is sometimes considered to be a full species.
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Capricorn silvereye
Collocalia buday
Collocalia buday
Collocalia buday is an extinct species of large swiftlet from the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene of Australia. It was described in 2001 by Walter Boles from fossil material found at Riversleigh, in the Boodjamulla National Park of north-western Queensland.
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Collocalia buday
Orthonyx kaldowinyeri
Orthonyx kaldowinyeri
Orthonyx kaldowinyeri is an extinct species of logrunner from the Late Oligocene to the Miocene of Australia. It was described by Walter Boles from fossil material found at the Last Minute Site of Riversleigh, in the Boodjamulla National Park of north-western Queensland. It was a relatively small logrunner. The specific epithet kaldowinyeri is an Aboriginal term for “old”, referring to the Miocene age of the species which is earlier than that of oth ...
er members of the genus.
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Orthonyx kaldowinyeri
Northern barred frog
Northern barred frog
The northern barred frog is a large, ground dwelling frog native to tropical northern Queensland, Australia.
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Northern barred frog
Elseya albagula
Elseya albagula
Elseya albagula, commonly known as the white-throated snapping turtle, is one of the largest species of chelid turtles in the world, growing to about 45 cm carapace length. The species is endemic to south-eastern Queensland, Australia, in the Burnett, Mary, and Fitzroy River drainages. This species is entirely aquatic, rarely coming ashore and is chiefly herbivorous, feeding on the fruits and buds of riparian vegetation, algae, and large aquatic ...
plants. First proposed as a species by John Goode in the 1960s, it was finally described in 2006. The species is named from the Latin alba = white and gula = throat, which is a reference to the white blotching present on the throats of adult females in the species. The type locality for the species is the Burnett River in south-eastern Queensland, but it is also found in the Mary and Fitzroy River drainages to the north of the Burnett. Some have argued for each of these rivers to represent different species, but DNA, morphological, and morphometric analyses does not support this conclusion.
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Elseya albagula
Bluff Downs giant python
Bluff Downs giant python
The Bluff Downs giant python is an extinct species of snake from Queensland, Australia, that lived during the Early Pliocene. The Bluff Downs giant python hunted mammals, birds and reptiles in the woodlands and vine thickets bordering Australian watercourses during Pliocene times. Its nearest living relative is the olive python .
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Bluff Downs giant python
Carphodactylus
Carphodactylus
Carphodactylus is a monotypic genus of geckos in the family Carphodactylidae. The genus consists of the sole species Carphodactylus laevis, commonly known as the chameleon gecko. The species is endemic to the rainforests of northeastern Australia. It is rated as Least Concern, as it is common within its range and occurs within protected areas. It currently experiences no major threats, though long-term climate change may alter or reduce its ...
geographic distribution under some scenarios.
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Carphodactylus
Northern leaf-tailed gecko
Northern leaf-tailed gecko
The northern leaf-tailed gecko is a species of the genus Saltuarius, the Australian leaf-tailed geckos.
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Northern leaf-tailed gecko
Gulf snapping turtle
Gulf snapping turtle
The Gulf snapping turtle or Lavaracks' turtle is a large species of freshwater turtle in the sidenecked family Chelidae. The species is endemic to northern Australia in northwest Queensland and northeast Northern Territory. The species, similar to other members of the Australian snapping turtles in genus Elseya, only comes ashore to lay eggs and bask. The Gulf snapping turtle is a herbivore and primarily consumes Pandanus and figs.
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Gulf snapping turtle
Elseya uberrima
Elseya uberrima
Elseya uberrima is an Eocene species of extinct Australian snapping turtle.
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Elseya uberrima
Cryptoblepharus virgatus
Cryptoblepharus virgatus
Cryptoblepharus virgatus, also commonly known as striped snake-eyed skink, cream-striped shinning-skink, wall skink, fence skink or snake-eyed skink is a skink commonly found in southern and eastern Australia. It is an active little lizard, and if threatened will often play dead to confuse the attacker.
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Cryptoblepharus virgatus
Concinnia queenslandiae
Concinnia queenslandiae
The prickly skink, or prickly forest skink, is a morphologically and genetically distinctive species of skink endemic to rainforests of the Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area, in north-eastern Australia. Unlike most small skinks, which have smooth scales, this species has rough, ridged and pointed scales. These keeled scales may be an adaptation to its high-rainfall habitat, to its microhabitat in rotting logs, or to camouflage it ...
when moving through forest leaf-litter.
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Concinnia queenslandiae
Techmarscincus
Techmarscincus
Techmarscincus is a genus of skink, a lizard in the family Scincidae. The genus is endemic to Australia, and is monotypic, containing the sole species Techmarscincus jigurru. Techmarscincus jigurru, commonly known as the Bartle Frere skink, is a species of rare and endangered lizard first discovered in 1981. It was described and named in 1984 by the late Australian herpetologist Jeanette Covacevich.
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Techmarscincus
Collared delma
Collared delma
The collared delma or adorned delma is the smallest species of lizard in the Pygopodidae family endemic to Australia. Pygopopdids are legless lizards, so are commonly mistaken for snakes. They are distributed mainly across south-east Queensland and northern New South Wales, in both forests and some suburban areas. They are active during the day, seen foraging and hunting for small insects.
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Collared delma
Cacophis churchilli
Cacophis churchilli
Cacophis churchilli is a species of elapid snake. Its common name is northern dwarf crowned snake. Its range is the wet tropics of Queensland between Townsville and Cooktown.
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Cacophis churchilli
Atherton delma
Atherton delma
The Atherton delma is a species of lizard in the Pygopodidae family endemic to Australia.
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Atherton delma
Ctenotus zebrilla
Ctenotus zebrilla
Ctenotus zebrilla, also known commonly as the Southern Cape York fine-snout ctenotus, is a species of skink, a lizard in the family Scincidae. The species is endemic to Australia.
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Ctenotus zebrilla
Black Mountain rainbow-skink
Black Mountain rainbow-skink
The Black Mountain rainbow-skink is an endemic species that inhabits a total of 6 km2 on Black Mountain in Queensland, Australia. The species is 70 mm long with a weight between 4 and 6 grams.
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Black Mountain rainbow-skink
Congoo gecko
Congoo gecko
The Congoo gecko is a species of lizard in the family Diplodactylidae. The species is endemic to Australia.
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Congoo gecko
Striped-tailed delma
Striped-tailed delma
The striped-tailed delma or single-striped delma is a species of lizard in the Pygopodidae family endemic to Australia.
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Striped-tailed delma
Golden-eyed gecko
Golden-eyed gecko
The golden-eyed gecko is a species of lizard in the family Diplodactylidae. The species is endemic to Australia.
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Golden-eyed gecko
Lemur-like ringtail possum
Lemur-like ringtail possum
The lemur-like ringtail possum, also known as the lemuroid ringtail possum or the brushy-tailed ringtail, is one of the most singular members of the ringtail possum group. It was once thought that they were gliding possums ; Hemibelideus literally translates as "half-glider" . They are similar to lemurs in their facial characteristics, with short snouts, large, forward-facing eyes and small ears, but similar to gliders in their musculo-skeletal ...
adaptations to accommodate a leaping lifestyle. Their long, prehensile tail is a further adaptation to their arboreal habitat.
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Lemur-like ringtail possum
Mareeba rock-wallaby
Mareeba rock-wallaby
The Mareeba rock-wallaby is a rare species of rock-wallaby found around Mareeba in northeastern Queensland, Australia.
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Mareeba rock-wallaby
Northern bettong
Northern bettong
The northern bettong is a small potoroid marsupial which is restricted to some areas of mixed open Eucalyptus woodlands and Allocasuarina forests bordering rainforests in far northeastern Queensland, Australia. They are known as "rat kangaroos" and move about in a slow hopping manner. There are five different species in Australia of this particular animal. It is about the size of a rabbit with a large tail dragging behind.
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Northern bettong
Coppery brushtail possum
Coppery brushtail possum
The coppery brushtail possum is a species of marsupial possum in the family Phalangeridae. Coppery brushtails are found within the Atherton Tablelands area of Queensland, in northeastern Australia. These mammals inhabit rainforest ecosystems, living within the tree canopy. Though they have a restricted distribution, they are locally common. This population is often considered a subspecies of T. vulpecula.
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Coppery brushtail possum
Proserpine rock-wallaby
Proserpine rock-wallaby
The Proserpine rock-wallaby is a species of rock-wallaby restricted to a small area in Conway National Park, Dryander National Park, Gloucester Island National Park, and around the town of Airlie Beach, all in Whitsunday Shire in Queensland, Australia. It is a threatened species, being classified by the IUCN as endangered.
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Proserpine rock-wallaby
Green ringtail possum
Green ringtail possum
The green ringtail possum is a species of ringtail possum found only in northern Australia. This makes it unique in its genus, all other members of which are found in New Guinea or nearby islands. The green ringtail possum is found in a tiny area of northeastern Queensland, between Paluma and Mount Windsor Tableland.
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Green ringtail possum
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