Eremoryzomys

Eremoryzomys

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SPECIES
Eremoryzomys polius

Eremoryzomys polius, also known as the gray rice rat or the Marañon oryzomys, is a rodent species in the tribe Oryzomyini of the family Cricetidae. Discovered in 1912 and first described in 1913 by Wilfred Osgood, it was originally placed in Oryzomys and named Oryzomys polius. In 2006, a cladistic analysis found that it was not closely related to Oryzomys in the strict sense or to any other oryzomyine then known, so that it is now placed in its own genus, Eremoryzomys. The Brazilian genus Drymoreomys, named in 2011, is probably the closest relative of Eremoryzomys. Eremoryzomys has a limited distribution in the dry upper valley of the Marañón River in central Peru, but may yet contain more than one species. A large, long-tailed rice rat, with head and body length of 138 to 164 mm, E. polius has gray fur and short ears. There are well-developed ungual tufts of hair on the hindfeet. Females have eight mammae. The rostrum is long and robust and the braincase is rounded. The bony palate is relatively short. The IUCN assesses the conservation status of the species as ""Data Deficient""; it is poorly known but may be threatened by habitat destruction.

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Distribution

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Eremoryzomys habitat map

References

1. Eremoryzomys Wikipedia article - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eremoryzomys
2. Eremoryzomys on The IUCN Red List site - https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/15609/22338308

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