Hawaiian crow

Hawaiian crow

Kingdom
Phylum
Class
Family
Genus
SPECIES
Corvus hawaiiensis

The Hawaiian crow or ʻalalā is a species of bird in the crow family, Corvidae, that is currently extinct in the wild, though reintroduction programs are underway. It is about the size of the carrion crow at 48–50 cm in length, but with more rounded wings and a much thicker bill. It has soft, brownish-black plumage and long, bristly throat feathers; the feet, legs and bill are black. Today, the Hawaiian crow is considered the most endangered of the family Corvidae. They are recorded to have lived up to 18 years in the wild, and 28 years in captivity. Some Native Hawaiians consider the Hawaiian crow an ʻaumakua . The species is known for strong flying ability and resourcefulness, and the reasons for its extirpation are not fully understood. It is thought that introduced diseases, such as Toxoplasma gondii, avian malaria, and fowlpox, were probably a significant factor in the species' decline.

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Distribution

Geography

Hawaiian crow habitat map

Habits and Lifestyle

Seasonal behavior

Diet and Nutrition

References

1. Hawaiian crow Wikipedia article - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawaiian_crow
2. Hawaiian crow on The IUCN Red List site - https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/22706052/94048187

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