region

Animals of Jersey

17 species

Jersey is an island country and self-governing Crown Dependency near the coast of north-west France. It is the largest of the Channel Islands and is 14 miles from the Cotentin Peninsula in Normandy.

Four species of small mammal are considered native: the wood mouse, the Jersey bank vole, the Lesser white-toothed shrew and the French shrew, Three wild mammals are well-established introductions: the rabbit, the red squirrel and the hedgehog, The stoat became extinct in Jersey between 1976 and 2000. The Green lizard is a protected species of reptile; Jersey is its only native habitat in the British Isles.

The red-billed chough became extinct in Jersey around 1900, when changes in farming and grazing practices led to a decline in the coastal slope habitat required by this species.

Jersey is the only place in the British Isles where the agile frog is found. The remaining population of agile frogs on Jersey is very small and is restricted to the south west of the island.

Trees generally considered native are the alder, silver birch, sweet chestnut, hazel, hawthorn, beech, ash, aspen, wild cherry, blackthorn, holm oak, oak, sallow, elder, elm and medlar, Among notable introduced species, the cabbage palm has been planted in coastal areas and may be seen in many gardens.

Notable marine species include the ormer, conger, bass, undulate ray, grey mullet, ballan wrasse and garfish. Marine mammals include the bottlenosed dolphin and grey seal.

Historically the island has given its name to a variety of overly-large cabbage, the Jersey cabbage, also known as Jersey kale or cow cabbage.

Japanese Knotweed is an invasive species that threatens Jersey's biodiversity. It is easily recognisable and has hollow stems with small white flowers that are produced in late summer. Other non-native species on the island include the Colorado beetle, burnet rose and oak processionary moth.

Jersey is an island country and self-governing Crown Dependency near the coast of north-west France. It is the largest of the Channel Islands and is 14 miles from the Cotentin Peninsula in Normandy.

Four species of small mammal are considered native: the wood mouse, the Jersey bank vole, the Lesser white-toothed shrew and the French shrew, Three wild mammals are well-established introductions: the rabbit, the red squirrel and the hedgehog, The stoat became extinct in Jersey between 1976 and 2000. The Green lizard is a protected species of reptile; Jersey is its only native habitat in the British Isles.

The red-billed chough became extinct in Jersey around 1900, when changes in farming and grazing practices led to a decline in the coastal slope habitat required by this species.

Jersey is the only place in the British Isles where the agile frog is found. The remaining population of agile frogs on Jersey is very small and is restricted to the south west of the island.

Trees generally considered native are the alder, silver birch, sweet chestnut, hazel, hawthorn, beech, ash, aspen, wild cherry, blackthorn, holm oak, oak, sallow, elder, elm and medlar, Among notable introduced species, the cabbage palm has been planted in coastal areas and may be seen in many gardens.

Notable marine species include the ormer, conger, bass, undulate ray, grey mullet, ballan wrasse and garfish. Marine mammals include the bottlenosed dolphin and grey seal.

Historically the island has given its name to a variety of overly-large cabbage, the Jersey cabbage, also known as Jersey kale or cow cabbage.

Japanese Knotweed is an invasive species that threatens Jersey's biodiversity. It is easily recognisable and has hollow stems with small white flowers that are produced in late summer. Other non-native species on the island include the Colorado beetle, burnet rose and oak processionary moth.