Labrador Wolf
Kingdom
Phylum
Subphylum
Class
Order
Suborder
Family
Genus
SPECIES
Canis lupus labradorius
Population size
Unknown
Life Span
10-20 years
Top speed
65
40
km/hmph
km/h mph 
Weight
33
73
kglbs
kg lbs 
Length
132-189
52-74.4
cminch
cm inch 

The Labrador wolf (Canis lupus labradorius) is a subspecies of Grey wolf. It is one of the least studied because it is very feared by people. It is closely related to the Newfoundland wolf.

No

Nocturnal

Ca

Carnivore

Vi

Viviparous

Te

Terrestrial

Cu

Cursorial

No

Nomadic

Ap

Apex predator

Pa

Pack hunters

Pu

Pursuit predator

Am

Ambush predator

Al

Altricial

Te

Territorial

Mo

Monogamy

So

Social

Do

Dominance hierarchy

No

Not a migrant

L

starts with

Appearance

The Labrador wolf is a medium-sized, light-colored subspecies. Its coloration has been described as ranging from dark grizzly-gray to almost white. It looks very similar to the Eastern wolf but is larger in size.

Distribution

Geography

This subspecies lives in Labrador and northern Quebec. Recently there were also confirmed sightings in Newfoundland. Wolves live in boreal forests, taiga, coastline wetlands, shrublands, and tundra. Their habitat depends on the abundance of prey, snow conditions, livestock densities, road densities, human presence, and topography.

Labrador Wolf habitat map

Climate zones

Labrador Wolf habitat map
Labrador Wolf
Public Domain Dedication (CC0)

Habits and Lifestyle

Little is known about the behavior of Labrador wolves. Like all Grey wolves. they live, hunt, and travel in packs. Usually, packs of Grey wolves include the alpha male and female with their young as well as older offspring. The alphas are the leaders of the pack, establishing the group's territory, selecting the den sites, tracking down, and hunting prey. They live in close ties with the members of their pack, communicating with each other through a wide variety of calls, including barks, whines, howls, and growls. Grey wolves are nocturnal predators. They move around their territory when hunting, using the same trails for extended periods. These follow the banks of rivers, the shorelines of lakes, and ravines overgrown with shrubs, plantations, roads, and human paths. Grey wolves prefer moving at night, being able to travel up to 200 km (124 miles) per day. Throughout the year, they undergo stationary and nomadic phases: the stationary phase takes place in the spring and summer months, when they grow up young, while the nomadic phase lasts from autumn to winter.

Group name
Seasonal behavior

Diet and Nutrition

Labrador wolves are carnivores. Within their range, they mainly prey on caribou, Harp seals, foxes, moose, muskoxen, hares, beavers, fish, and some rodents.

Mating Habits

MATING BEHAVIOR
REPRODUCTION SEASON
January-April
PREGNANCY DURATION
60-63 days
BABY CARRYING
1-14 pups
INDEPENDENT AGE
8-10 weeks
FEMALE NAME
bitch
MALE NAME
dog
BABY NAME
pup, whelp

Little information is available about the reproductive habits of Labrador wolves. In general, within a pack of Grey wolves, only the alpha male and female breed. The alphas are monogamous, mating for life until one of the mates dies, after which a new alpha male or female is determined, and the pair is re-established. Grey wolves breed from January to April. The female is responsible for digging a den, where she further gives birth and raises the pups. The gestation period lasts about 60-63 days, after which 1-14 helpless pups are born with an average of 6-7. For the first 45 days, all members of the pack participate in feeding the pups through regurgitation. The mother stays with the young for the first 3 weeks, after which the pups continue living in the den until they reach the age of 8-10 weeks. Females become reproductively mature at 2 years old, and males when they are 3 years old.

Population

Population threats

Due to overhunting in the early 1900s, Labrador wolf sightings were infrequent through the 1950s. As a whole, primary threats to Grey wolves include loss and fragmentation of their habitat, leading to a considerable reduction of their population. Due to being considered livestock predators, these animals are frequently killed both individually and in whole packs. In some areas of their range, Grey wolves are not legally protected and thus are widely hunted and trapped.

Population number

The IUCN Red List and other sources don’t provide the number of the Labrador wolf total population size. Presently, this subspecies is not included in the IUCN Red List and its conservation status has not been evaluated.

Ecological niche

Grey wolves feed upon a wide variety of animal species and thus control the numbers of their populations; this way wolves benefit different animal and plant species of their range.

Coloring Pages

References

1. Labrador wolf Wikipedia article - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labrador_wolf

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