Flying lemurs

2 species

Flying lemurs are arboreal gliding mammals that are native to Southeast Asia. They are the most capable gliders of all gliding mammals. A fur-covered membrane, called a patagium, connects to their face, paws, and tail. This enables them to glide in the air for distances of up to 200 meters (650 feet) between trees. Flying lemurs are also known as colugos or cobegos, however, they are not actually lemurs, though they resemble them, and like colugos, some lemur species are nocturnal. Flying lemurs are shy, solitary animals found in the tropical forests of Southeast Asia. They are unskilled climbers and move up trees in a series of slow hops, gripping onto the bark with their small, sharp claws. They spend most of the day curled up in tree hollows or hanging inconspicuously under branches. At night, flying lemurs spend most of their time up in the trees foraging, and glide either to find another foraging tree or to find possible mates and protect territory. Flying lemurs suffer from the ongoing clearing of their rainforest habitat and are hunted for their meat and fur. They are also a favorite prey item for the gravely endangered Philippine eagle, some studies even suggest flying lemurs comprise 90% of the eagle's diet.
Flying lemurs are arboreal gliding mammals that are native to Southeast Asia. They are the most capable gliders of all gliding mammals. A fur-covered membrane, called a patagium, connects to their face, paws, and tail. This enables them to glide in the air for distances of up to 200 meters (650 feet) between trees. Flying lemurs are also known as colugos or cobegos, however, they are not actually lemurs, though they resemble them, and like colugos, some lemur species are nocturnal. Flying lemurs are shy, solitary animals found in the tropical forests of Southeast Asia. They are unskilled climbers and move up trees in a series of slow hops, gripping onto the bark with their small, sharp claws. They spend most of the day curled up in tree hollows or hanging inconspicuously under branches. At night, flying lemurs spend most of their time up in the trees foraging, and glide either to find another foraging tree or to find possible mates and protect territory. Flying lemurs suffer from the ongoing clearing of their rainforest habitat and are hunted for their meat and fur. They are also a favorite prey item for the gravely endangered Philippine eagle, some studies even suggest flying lemurs comprise 90% of the eagle's diet.