Great Apes

15 species

Great apes or hominids are a taxonomic family of primates that includes eight extant species in four genera: Pongo (the Bornean, Sumatran, and Tapanuli orangutan), Gorilla (the eastern and western gorilla), Pan (the chimpanzee and the bonobo), and Homo, of which only modern humans remain. The original meaning of "hominid" referred only to humans (Homo) and their closest extinct relatives. However, by the 1990s humans, apes, and their ancestors were considered to be "hominids". The great apes are tailless primates, with the smallest living species being the bonobo at 30-40 kilograms in weight, and the largest being the eastern gorillas, with males weighing 140-180 kilograms. In all great apes, the males are, on average, larger and stronger than the females. Although most living species are predominantly quadrupedal, they are all able to use their hands for gathering food or nesting materials, and, in some cases, for tool use. All species are omnivorous, but chimpanzees and orangutans primarily eat fruit. Gorillas and chimpanzees live in family groups of around 5 to 10 individuals, although much larger groups are sometimes noted. Chimpanzees live in larger groups that break up into smaller groups when fruit becomes less available. Gestation in great apes lasts 8-9 months and results in the birth of a single offspring, or, rarely, twins. The young are born helpless, and require care for long periods of time. Compared with most other mammals, great apes have remarkably long adolescence, not being weaned for several years, and not becoming fully mature for 8 to 13 years in most species (longer in orangutans and humans). As a result, females typically give birth only once every few years.
Great apes or hominids are a taxonomic family of primates that includes eight extant species in four genera: Pongo (the Bornean, Sumatran, and Tapanuli orangutan), Gorilla (the eastern and western gorilla), Pan (the chimpanzee and the bonobo), and Homo, of which only modern humans remain. The original meaning of "hominid" referred only to humans (Homo) and their closest extinct relatives. However, by the 1990s humans, apes, and their ancestors were considered to be "hominids". The great apes are tailless primates, with the smallest living species being the bonobo at 30-40 kilograms in weight, and the largest being the eastern gorillas, with males weighing 140-180 kilograms. In all great apes, the males are, on average, larger and stronger than the females. Although most living species are predominantly quadrupedal, they are all able to use their hands for gathering food or nesting materials, and, in some cases, for tool use. All species are omnivorous, but chimpanzees and orangutans primarily eat fruit. Gorillas and chimpanzees live in family groups of around 5 to 10 individuals, although much larger groups are sometimes noted. Chimpanzees live in larger groups that break up into smaller groups when fruit becomes less available. Gestation in great apes lasts 8-9 months and results in the birth of a single offspring, or, rarely, twins. The young are born helpless, and require care for long periods of time. Compared with most other mammals, great apes have remarkably long adolescence, not being weaned for several years, and not becoming fully mature for 8 to 13 years in most species (longer in orangutans and humans). As a result, females typically give birth only once every few years.