Hippopotamuses

2 species

Hippopotamuses are naked-skinned semiaquatic mammals found in Africa. While they resemble pigs physiologically, their closest living relatives are the cetaceans. There are two living species of hippopotamuses: the pygmy hippo and the common hippo. The pygmy hippo is small and shy and displays many terrestrial adaptations; however, like the common hippo, it is semiaquatic and relies on water to keep its skin moist and its body temperature cool. A rare nocturnal forest creature, the pygmy hippo is a difficult animal to study in the wild and it was unknown outside West Africa until the 19th century. The behavior of pygmy hippos differs from common hippos in many ways. While common hippos are gregarious, pygmy hippos live either alone or in small groups, typically a mated pair or a mother and calf. These adorable animals are primarily threatened by loss of habitat, as forests are logged and converted to farmland, and are also vulnerable to poaching, hunting for bushmeat, natural predators, and war. The common hippo is the third-largest type of land mammal. Despite its stocky shape and short legs, it is capable of running 30 km/h (19 mph) over short distances. They inhabit rivers, lakes, and mangrove swamps, where territorial bulls preside over a stretch of water, and over groups of five to thirty cows and calves. Common hippos are among the most dangerous animals in the world due to their highly aggressive and unpredictable nature. They are threatened by habitat loss and poaching for their meat and ivory canine teeth.
Hippopotamuses are naked-skinned semiaquatic mammals found in Africa. While they resemble pigs physiologically, their closest living relatives are the cetaceans. There are two living species of hippopotamuses: the pygmy hippo and the common hippo. The pygmy hippo is small and shy and displays many terrestrial adaptations; however, like the common hippo, it is semiaquatic and relies on water to keep its skin moist and its body temperature cool. A rare nocturnal forest creature, the pygmy hippo is a difficult animal to study in the wild and it was unknown outside West Africa until the 19th century. The behavior of pygmy hippos differs from common hippos in many ways. While common hippos are gregarious, pygmy hippos live either alone or in small groups, typically a mated pair or a mother and calf. These adorable animals are primarily threatened by loss of habitat, as forests are logged and converted to farmland, and are also vulnerable to poaching, hunting for bushmeat, natural predators, and war. The common hippo is the third-largest type of land mammal. Despite its stocky shape and short legs, it is capable of running 30 km/h (19 mph) over short distances. They inhabit rivers, lakes, and mangrove swamps, where territorial bulls preside over a stretch of water, and over groups of five to thirty cows and calves. Common hippos are among the most dangerous animals in the world due to their highly aggressive and unpredictable nature. They are threatened by habitat loss and poaching for their meat and ivory canine teeth.