Horses, zebras, and asses

33 species

Horses, zebras, and asses are all members of the horse family known as Equidae. The term equid refers to any member of this family, including any equine. Horses are adapted to run, as this trait allows them to quickly escape predators. They also possess an excellent sense of balance and a strong fight-or-flight response. Horses developed an unusual trait that is related to their need to be able to quickly flee from predators: they are able to sleep both standing up and lying down and younger horses tend to sleep significantly more than adults. Horses have the largest eyes of any land mammal, and their eyes are positioned on the sides of their heads. This means that horses have a range of vision of more than 350°. Humans began domesticating horses around 4000 BC, although some domesticated populations live in the wild as feral horses. Zebras are African equines with distinctive black-and-white striped coats. Their dazzling stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual and they make zebras among the most recognizable mammals. They have been featured in art and stories in Africa and beyond. Historically, zebras have been highly sought after by exotic animal collectors, but unlike horses and donkeys, they have never been truly domesticated. Donkeys or asses are domestic animals in the horse family. They derive from the African wild ass and have been used as working animals for at least 5000 years. Donkeys are adapted to marginal desert lands. Unlike wild and feral horses, wild donkeys in dry areas are solitary and do not form harems. The loud call or bray of the donkey, which typically lasts for 20 seconds and can be heard for over 3 kilometers (1.8 mi), may help keep in contact with other donkeys over the wide spaces of the desert. Donkeys have large ears, which may pick up more distant sounds, and may help cool the donkey's blood. These animals can defend themselves by biting, striking with the front hooves, or kicking with the hind legs. Their vocalization, called a bray, is an "E" followed by an "ah".
Horses, zebras, and asses are all members of the horse family known as Equidae. The term equid refers to any member of this family, including any equine. Horses are adapted to run, as this trait allows them to quickly escape predators. They also possess an excellent sense of balance and a strong fight-or-flight response. Horses developed an unusual trait that is related to their need to be able to quickly flee from predators: they are able to sleep both standing up and lying down and younger horses tend to sleep significantly more than adults. Horses have the largest eyes of any land mammal, and their eyes are positioned on the sides of their heads. This means that horses have a range of vision of more than 350°. Humans began domesticating horses around 4000 BC, although some domesticated populations live in the wild as feral horses. Zebras are African equines with distinctive black-and-white striped coats. Their dazzling stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual and they make zebras among the most recognizable mammals. They have been featured in art and stories in Africa and beyond. Historically, zebras have been highly sought after by exotic animal collectors, but unlike horses and donkeys, they have never been truly domesticated. Donkeys or asses are domestic animals in the horse family. They derive from the African wild ass and have been used as working animals for at least 5000 years. Donkeys are adapted to marginal desert lands. Unlike wild and feral horses, wild donkeys in dry areas are solitary and do not form harems. The loud call or bray of the donkey, which typically lasts for 20 seconds and can be heard for over 3 kilometers (1.8 mi), may help keep in contact with other donkeys over the wide spaces of the desert. Donkeys have large ears, which may pick up more distant sounds, and may help cool the donkey's blood. These animals can defend themselves by biting, striking with the front hooves, or kicking with the hind legs. Their vocalization, called a bray, is an "E" followed by an "ah".