Kangaroos and Wallabies

65 species

Kangaroos and wallabies are marsupials native to the Australian continent (the mainland and Tasmania), New Guinea, and nearby islands. The largest species in the family are called "kangaroos" and the smallest are generally called "wallabies". Kangaroos and wallabies have large, powerful hind legs, large feet adapted for leaping, a long muscular tail for balance, and a small head. Wallabies also use their powerful hind legs to administer vigorous kicks to fend off potential predators. Like most marsupials, female kangaroos have a pouch called a marsupium in which joeys complete postnatal development. The large kangaroos have adapted much better than the smaller macropods to land clearing for pastoral agriculture and habitat changes brought to the Australian landscape by humans. Wallabies are widely distributed across Australia, particularly in more remote, heavily timbered, or rugged areas, less so on the great semi-arid plains that are better suited to the larger, leaner, and more fleet-footed kangaroos. They also can be found on the island of New Guinea. The kangaroo is a symbol of Australia, appears on the Australian coat of arms and on some of its currency. The animal is important to both Australian culture and the national image, and consequently, there are numerous popular culture references.
Kangaroos and wallabies are marsupials native to the Australian continent (the mainland and Tasmania), New Guinea, and nearby islands. The largest species in the family are called "kangaroos" and the smallest are generally called "wallabies". Kangaroos and wallabies have large, powerful hind legs, large feet adapted for leaping, a long muscular tail for balance, and a small head. Wallabies also use their powerful hind legs to administer vigorous kicks to fend off potential predators. Like most marsupials, female kangaroos have a pouch called a marsupium in which joeys complete postnatal development. The large kangaroos have adapted much better than the smaller macropods to land clearing for pastoral agriculture and habitat changes brought to the Australian landscape by humans. Wallabies are widely distributed across Australia, particularly in more remote, heavily timbered, or rugged areas, less so on the great semi-arid plains that are better suited to the larger, leaner, and more fleet-footed kangaroos. They also can be found on the island of New Guinea. The kangaroo is a symbol of Australia, appears on the Australian coat of arms and on some of its currency. The animal is important to both Australian culture and the national image, and consequently, there are numerous popular culture references.