Larks

95 species

Larks are passerine birds that have a Cosmopolitan distribution with the largest number of species occurring in Africa. Only a single species, the horned lark, occurs in North America, and only Horsfield\'s bush lark occurs in Australia. Like many ground birds, most lark species have long hind claws, which are thought to provide stability while standing. Most have streaked brown plumage, some boldly marked with black or white. Their dull appearance camouflages them on the ground, especially when on the nest. They feed on insects and seeds and many species dig with their bills to uncover food. Larks have more elaborate calls than most birds and often extravagant songs given in display flight. Male larks use song flights to defend their breeding territory and attract a mate. Most species build nests on the ground but a few desert species nest very low in bushes. The size of the clutch ranges from the single egg laid by Sclater\'s lark up to 6-8 eggs laid by the Calandra lark and the Black lark. Incubation typically takes between 11 and 16 days.
Larks are passerine birds that have a Cosmopolitan distribution with the largest number of species occurring in Africa. Only a single species, the horned lark, occurs in North America, and only Horsfield\'s bush lark occurs in Australia. Like many ground birds, most lark species have long hind claws, which are thought to provide stability while standing. Most have streaked brown plumage, some boldly marked with black or white. Their dull appearance camouflages them on the ground, especially when on the nest. They feed on insects and seeds and many species dig with their bills to uncover food. Larks have more elaborate calls than most birds and often extravagant songs given in display flight. Male larks use song flights to defend their breeding territory and attract a mate. Most species build nests on the ground but a few desert species nest very low in bushes. The size of the clutch ranges from the single egg laid by Sclater\'s lark up to 6-8 eggs laid by the Calandra lark and the Black lark. Incubation typically takes between 11 and 16 days.