Lemurs and other prosimians

122 species

Lemurs and other prosimians collectively are referred to as strepsirrhines, these consist of the lemurs of Madagascar, galagos ("bushbabies") and pottos from Africa, and the lorises from India and southeast Asia.These animals are defined by their "wet" (moist) tip of the snout, large olfactory lobes for smell, and a vomeronasal organ to detect pheromones. Their eyes contain a reflective layer to improve their night vision, and these primates also produce their own vitamin C. Lemurs are also characterized by a toothcomb, a specialized set of teeth in the front, lower part of their mouths which they mostly use for combing fur during grooming.Some strepsirrhine species are nocturnal, while others are diurnal. Yet some or all of the brown lemurs (Eulemur) are cathemeral, which means that they may be active during the day or night. Many of these primates are considered "solitary foragers", however, many exhibit complex and diverse social organization, socilizing at night, and sharing sleeping sites during the day. They are predominantly arboreal and feed on fruits, seeds, leaves, flowers, and animal prey. Many of today's living strepsirrhines are endangered due to various human activities. Although hunting is often prohibited, the laws protecting them are rarely enforced. In Madagascar, local taboos known as 'fady' sometimes help protect lemur species, although some are still hunted for traditional medicine.
Lemurs and other prosimians collectively are referred to as strepsirrhines, these consist of the lemurs of Madagascar, galagos ("bushbabies") and pottos from Africa, and the lorises from India and southeast Asia.These animals are defined by their "wet" (moist) tip of the snout, large olfactory lobes for smell, and a vomeronasal organ to detect pheromones. Their eyes contain a reflective layer to improve their night vision, and these primates also produce their own vitamin C. Lemurs are also characterized by a toothcomb, a specialized set of teeth in the front, lower part of their mouths which they mostly use for combing fur during grooming.Some strepsirrhine species are nocturnal, while others are diurnal. Yet some or all of the brown lemurs (Eulemur) are cathemeral, which means that they may be active during the day or night. Many of these primates are considered "solitary foragers", however, many exhibit complex and diverse social organization, socilizing at night, and sharing sleeping sites during the day. They are predominantly arboreal and feed on fruits, seeds, leaves, flowers, and animal prey. Many of today's living strepsirrhines are endangered due to various human activities. Although hunting is often prohibited, the laws protecting them are rarely enforced. In Madagascar, local taboos known as 'fady' sometimes help protect lemur species, although some are still hunted for traditional medicine.