Moles

47 species

Moles are small mammals adapted to a fossorial lifestyle. They have cylindrical bodies, velvety fur, very small, inconspicuous eyes and ears, reduced hindlimbs, and short, powerful forelimbs with large paws adapted for digging. Moles are found in most parts of North America, Europe, and Asia. They are thought to be solitary creatures and come together only to mate. They feed on earthworms and other small invertebrates found in the soil. The mole runs are in reality "worm traps", the mole sensing when a worm falls into the tunnel and quickly running along to kill and eat it. Because their saliva contains a toxin that can paralyze earthworms, moles are able to store their still-living prey for later consumption. They construct special underground "larders" for just this purpose. The Star-nosed mole can detect, catch and eat food faster than the human eye can follow! Moles are known pests to human activities such as agriculture, lawncare, and gardening. They do not eat plant roots but cause damage indirectly by eating their prey items in the soil. While moles may be viewed as pests, they do provide many positive contributions to the soil, gardens, and ecosystem, these include soil aeration, feeding on slugs and other small creatures that do eat plant roots, and thus providing prey for other wildlife.
Moles are small mammals adapted to a fossorial lifestyle. They have cylindrical bodies, velvety fur, very small, inconspicuous eyes and ears, reduced hindlimbs, and short, powerful forelimbs with large paws adapted for digging. Moles are found in most parts of North America, Europe, and Asia. They are thought to be solitary creatures and come together only to mate. They feed on earthworms and other small invertebrates found in the soil. The mole runs are in reality "worm traps", the mole sensing when a worm falls into the tunnel and quickly running along to kill and eat it. Because their saliva contains a toxin that can paralyze earthworms, moles are able to store their still-living prey for later consumption. They construct special underground "larders" for just this purpose. The Star-nosed mole can detect, catch and eat food faster than the human eye can follow! Moles are known pests to human activities such as agriculture, lawncare, and gardening. They do not eat plant roots but cause damage indirectly by eating their prey items in the soil. While moles may be viewed as pests, they do provide many positive contributions to the soil, gardens, and ecosystem, these include soil aeration, feeding on slugs and other small creatures that do eat plant roots, and thus providing prey for other wildlife.