Tapirs

7 species

Tapirs are large, herbivorous mammals, similar in shape to a pig, with a short, prehensile nose trunk. They live in jungle and forest regions of South and Central America, with one species inhabiting Southeast Asia. Although they frequently live in dryland forests, tapirs with access to rivers spend a good deal of time in and under water, feeding on soft vegetation, taking refuge from predators, and cooling off during hot periods. They will swim, sink to the bottom, and walk along the riverbed to feed, and may even submerge themselves to allow small fish to pick parasites off their bulky bodies. Along with freshwater lounging, tapirs often wallow in mud pits, which also help to keep them cool and free of insects. Tapirs are largely nocturnal and crepuscular animals, however, the smaller mountain tapir of the Andes is generally more active during the day. Tapirs eat fruit, berries, and leaves, particularly young, tender growth. They will spend many of their waking hours foraging along well-worn trails, snouts to the ground in search of food. Tapirs live about 25 to 30 years, both in the wild and in zoos. Apart from mothers and their young offspring, tapirs lead almost exclusively solitary lives.
Tapirs are large, herbivorous mammals, similar in shape to a pig, with a short, prehensile nose trunk. They live in jungle and forest regions of South and Central America, with one species inhabiting Southeast Asia. Although they frequently live in dryland forests, tapirs with access to rivers spend a good deal of time in and under water, feeding on soft vegetation, taking refuge from predators, and cooling off during hot periods. They will swim, sink to the bottom, and walk along the riverbed to feed, and may even submerge themselves to allow small fish to pick parasites off their bulky bodies. Along with freshwater lounging, tapirs often wallow in mud pits, which also help to keep them cool and free of insects. Tapirs are largely nocturnal and crepuscular animals, however, the smaller mountain tapir of the Andes is generally more active during the day. Tapirs eat fruit, berries, and leaves, particularly young, tender growth. They will spend many of their waking hours foraging along well-worn trails, snouts to the ground in search of food. Tapirs live about 25 to 30 years, both in the wild and in zoos. Apart from mothers and their young offspring, tapirs lead almost exclusively solitary lives.