The dog family

112 species

The dog family includes dog-like carnivorans, colloquially referred to as dogs, and constitutes a clade. Members of this family are also called canids.Canids are found on all continents except Antarctica. They vary in size from the 2-meter-long (6.6 ft) Gray wolf to the 24-centimetre-long (9.4 in) Fennec fox. They are mostly social animals, living together in family units or small groups and behaving cooperatively. Typically, only the dominant pair in a group breeds and a litter of young are reared annually in an underground den. Canids communicate by scent signals and vocalizations. One canid, the domestic dog, originated from a symbiotic relationship with Upper Paleolithic humans and today remains one of the most widely kept domestic animals. Human beings have trapped and hunted some canid species for their fur and some, especially the Gray wolf, the coyote, and the Red fox, for sport. Canids such as the dhole are now endangered in the wild because of persecution, habitat loss, depletion of ungulate prey species.
The dog family includes dog-like carnivorans, colloquially referred to as dogs, and constitutes a clade. Members of this family are also called canids.Canids are found on all continents except Antarctica. They vary in size from the 2-meter-long (6.6 ft) Gray wolf to the 24-centimetre-long (9.4 in) Fennec fox. They are mostly social animals, living together in family units or small groups and behaving cooperatively. Typically, only the dominant pair in a group breeds and a litter of young are reared annually in an underground den. Canids communicate by scent signals and vocalizations. One canid, the domestic dog, originated from a symbiotic relationship with Upper Paleolithic humans and today remains one of the most widely kept domestic animals. Human beings have trapped and hunted some canid species for their fur and some, especially the Gray wolf, the coyote, and the Red fox, for sport. Canids such as the dhole are now endangered in the wild because of persecution, habitat loss, depletion of ungulate prey species.