Titis, Sakis and Uakaris

51 species

The titis, saki monkeys, and uakaris belong to the family of New World monkeys. Most species are native to the Amazon region of Brazil, with some being found from Colombia in the north to Bolivia in the south. These are small to medium-sized monkeys, that have medium to long fur, in a wide range of colors, often with contrasting patches, especially on the face. Uakaris have the most striking red facial skin of any primate. Females choose their mates based on how red the male's face is. Evidence suggests that the red facial coloration reflects the health of the primate. The titis, saki monkeys, and uakaris are diurnal and arboreal animals, found in tropical forests from low-lying swamps to mountain slopes. They are predominantly herbivorous and eat mostly fruit and seeds, although some species will also consume a small number of insects. The uakaris and bearded sakis live in groups of 8-30 individuals and each group has multiple males, which establishes a dominance hierarchy amongst themselves. The titis and Pithecia sakis, by contrast, live in much smaller family groups. Titis are territorial and defend their territory by shouting and chasing off intruders. Often it is the father who cares for the young and carries it and brings it to the mother only for nursing. Fathers also tend to engage in more grooming, food-sharing, inspecting, aggression, and playing with infants than mothers.
The titis, saki monkeys, and uakaris belong to the family of New World monkeys. Most species are native to the Amazon region of Brazil, with some being found from Colombia in the north to Bolivia in the south. These are small to medium-sized monkeys, that have medium to long fur, in a wide range of colors, often with contrasting patches, especially on the face. Uakaris have the most striking red facial skin of any primate. Females choose their mates based on how red the male's face is. Evidence suggests that the red facial coloration reflects the health of the primate. The titis, saki monkeys, and uakaris are diurnal and arboreal animals, found in tropical forests from low-lying swamps to mountain slopes. They are predominantly herbivorous and eat mostly fruit and seeds, although some species will also consume a small number of insects. The uakaris and bearded sakis live in groups of 8-30 individuals and each group has multiple males, which establishes a dominance hierarchy amongst themselves. The titis and Pithecia sakis, by contrast, live in much smaller family groups. Titis are territorial and defend their territory by shouting and chasing off intruders. Often it is the father who cares for the young and carries it and brings it to the mother only for nursing. Fathers also tend to engage in more grooming, food-sharing, inspecting, aggression, and playing with infants than mothers.