Treecreepers

7 species

The treecreepers are small passerine birds, widespread in wooded regions of the Northern Hemisphere and sub-Saharan Africa. Their plumage is dull-colored, and as their name implies, they climb over the surface of trees in search of food. Their bills are gently down-curved and rather long, used for probing bark for insects and spiders. Treecreepers often climb up tree trunks in a helical path, hopping with their feet together; their toes are long and tipped with strongly curved claws for gripping. Treecreepers are often indifferent to humans. They can be seen singly or in pairs, sometimes in small family groups after fledging. These small birds are monogamous and territorial. Nests and eggs vary between the genera: some species usually nest in a gap between the tree bark and the tree, whereas the others place their nests in the fork of a branch. Incubation lasts 14 to 15 days, and young fledge after 15 to 16 days.
The treecreepers are small passerine birds, widespread in wooded regions of the Northern Hemisphere and sub-Saharan Africa. Their plumage is dull-colored, and as their name implies, they climb over the surface of trees in search of food. Their bills are gently down-curved and rather long, used for probing bark for insects and spiders. Treecreepers often climb up tree trunks in a helical path, hopping with their feet together; their toes are long and tipped with strongly curved claws for gripping. Treecreepers are often indifferent to humans. They can be seen singly or in pairs, sometimes in small family groups after fledging. These small birds are monogamous and territorial. Nests and eggs vary between the genera: some species usually nest in a gap between the tree bark and the tree, whereas the others place their nests in the fork of a branch. Incubation lasts 14 to 15 days, and young fledge after 15 to 16 days.