Trogons

42 species

The trogons and quetzals are birds of tropical and subtropical forests. They have a cosmopolitan distribution in the world\'s wet tropics, being found in the Americas, Africa, and Asia. These birds are fairly uniform in appearance, having compact bodies and long tails (very long in the case of the quetzals), and short necks. Their legs and feet are weak and short, and trogons are essentially unable to walk beyond a very occasional shuffle along a branch. They are even incapable of turning around on a branch without using their wings. In spite of the strength of their flight, trogons do not fly often or for great distances; they generally fly no more than a few hundred meters at a time. Only the montane species tend to make long-distance flights. Their flight can be surprisingly silent (for observers), although that of a few species is reportedly quite noisy. Trogons are territorial and monogamous. The birds nest in cavities dug with the beak by the male alone or by both sexes. Females lay between two and four eggs. On hatching, the chicks are altricial, blind, and naked. The nestling period varies by species and size, although 23-25 days is more typical. Trogons and quetzals are considered to be \"among the most beautiful of birds\", yet they are also often reclusive and seldom seen. They are nevertheless popular birds with birdwatchers, and there is a modest ecotourism industry, in particular, to view quetzals in Central America.
The trogons and quetzals are birds of tropical and subtropical forests. They have a cosmopolitan distribution in the world\'s wet tropics, being found in the Americas, Africa, and Asia. These birds are fairly uniform in appearance, having compact bodies and long tails (very long in the case of the quetzals), and short necks. Their legs and feet are weak and short, and trogons are essentially unable to walk beyond a very occasional shuffle along a branch. They are even incapable of turning around on a branch without using their wings. In spite of the strength of their flight, trogons do not fly often or for great distances; they generally fly no more than a few hundred meters at a time. Only the montane species tend to make long-distance flights. Their flight can be surprisingly silent (for observers), although that of a few species is reportedly quite noisy. Trogons are territorial and monogamous. The birds nest in cavities dug with the beak by the male alone or by both sexes. Females lay between two and four eggs. On hatching, the chicks are altricial, blind, and naked. The nestling period varies by species and size, although 23-25 days is more typical. Trogons and quetzals are considered to be \"among the most beautiful of birds\", yet they are also often reclusive and seldom seen. They are nevertheless popular birds with birdwatchers, and there is a modest ecotourism industry, in particular, to view quetzals in Central America.