Waders and shorebirds

389 species

Waders or shorebirds are birds that wade along shorelines and mudflats in order to forage for food; they crawl or burrow in the mud and sand, usually small aquatic insects or crustaceans. The term \"wader\" is used in Europe, while \"shorebird\" is used in North America, where \"wader\" may be used instead to refer to long-legged wading birds such as storks and herons. There are about 210 species of wader, most of which live in wetland or coastal environments. Those species living in the Arctic and temperate regions are strongly migratory, but tropical birds are often resident. Because most of these species spend much of their time near bodies of water, many have long legs suitable for wading (hence the name ‘Waders’). Some species prefer locations with rocks or mud. Many waders have sensitive nerve endings at the end of their bills which help them to detect prey items hidden in mud or soft soil. Species adapted to drier habitats feed on larger prey including insects and small reptiles.
Waders or shorebirds are birds that wade along shorelines and mudflats in order to forage for food; they crawl or burrow in the mud and sand, usually small aquatic insects or crustaceans. The term \"wader\" is used in Europe, while \"shorebird\" is used in North America, where \"wader\" may be used instead to refer to long-legged wading birds such as storks and herons. There are about 210 species of wader, most of which live in wetland or coastal environments. Those species living in the Arctic and temperate regions are strongly migratory, but tropical birds are often resident. Because most of these species spend much of their time near bodies of water, many have long legs suitable for wading (hence the name ‘Waders’). Some species prefer locations with rocks or mud. Many waders have sensitive nerve endings at the end of their bills which help them to detect prey items hidden in mud or soft soil. Species adapted to drier habitats feed on larger prey including insects and small reptiles.