Northern redbelly snake

Northern redbelly snake

Northern redbelly snake

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Kingdom
Phylum
Subphylum
Class
Order
Suborder
Family
Genus
SPECIES
Storeria occipitomaculata occipitomaculata

The northern redbelly snake (Storeria occipitomaculata occipitomaculata ) is a nonvenomous snake in the family Colubridae, a subspecies of Storeria occipitomaculata. It is sometimes referred to as a fire snake. It is endemic, North America and The Caribbean in some parts in Jamaica, and Saskatchewan to Nova Scotia in the north and south to Florida and Texas.

Appearance

Adults and young have known dorsal colorations of solid olive-brown, tan-brown, chestnut-brown, grey-brown, grey or even black. They have three yellow spots posterior to the head shields, to which the specific name occipitomaculata (meaning spotted back of the head) refers. The underside is coral-red to brick-red. Coloration is usually made up of three different shades forming a striped pattern. Like all species of the genus Storeria, redbelly snakes have keeled scales and no loreal scale. Some specimens have been found with three black dots on the top of the head. Adults grow to about 31 cm (12 in) in total length (body + tail).

Distribution

Geography

They live in moist flowerbeds, gardens, and moist woodlands, such as borders between a forest and a wetland. They often rest under logs and rocks near a woods or forest.

Habits and Lifestyle

Diet and Nutrition

They feed primarily on slugs and earthworms.

Mating Habits

The northern redbelly snake gives birth to live young. Each newborn measures about 7.6–11 centimetres (3.0–4.3 in) in total length.

Population

References

1. Northern redbelly snake Wikipedia article - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_redbelly_snake

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