region

Animals of Ogasawara-shoto

2 species

The Bonin Islands are an archipelago of over 30 subtropical and tropical islands in Micronesia, some 1,000 kilometres directly south of Tokyo, Japan.

The range of the Bonin petrel extends beyond the Ogasawaras to include other islands in the northern Pacific region.

There are two restricted-range species of birds on the islands; the Japanese woodpigeon and the Near Threatened Bonin white-eye, formerly known as 'Bonin honeyeater'. The Japanese woodpigeon was extirpated in the Iwo Island groups in the 1980s. The formerly endemic Bonin pigeon, Bonin thrush and Bonin grosbeak are now extinct.

A small bat, Sturdee's pipistrelle, is only known in one record and has not been seen since 1915. The Bonin flying fox, also called the Bonin fruit bat, is endemic to the islands. It is currently listed as Endangered, and a survey published by the Ogasawara Office of Education in 1999 estimated their number to be around 100.

The islands are also renowned for the many species of snail that found across the islands, especially the Mandarina snails. Unfortunately, most of the native snails are now endangered or extinct, because of introduced species and habitat loss.

The Bonin Islands are an archipelago of over 30 subtropical and tropical islands in Micronesia, some 1,000 kilometres directly south of Tokyo, Japan.

The range of the Bonin petrel extends beyond the Ogasawaras to include other islands in the northern Pacific region.

There are two restricted-range species of birds on the islands; the Japanese woodpigeon and the Near Threatened Bonin white-eye, formerly known as 'Bonin honeyeater'. The Japanese woodpigeon was extirpated in the Iwo Island groups in the 1980s. The formerly endemic Bonin pigeon, Bonin thrush and Bonin grosbeak are now extinct.

A small bat, Sturdee's pipistrelle, is only known in one record and has not been seen since 1915. The Bonin flying fox, also called the Bonin fruit bat, is endemic to the islands. It is currently listed as Endangered, and a survey published by the Ogasawara Office of Education in 1999 estimated their number to be around 100.

The islands are also renowned for the many species of snail that found across the islands, especially the Mandarina snails. Unfortunately, most of the native snails are now endangered or extinct, because of introduced species and habitat loss.