genus

Psophodes

4 species

The list of species of Psophodes genus

Psophodes is a genus of five species of songbirds endemic to Australia, known as whipbirds and wedgebills.

Psophodes are found in many areas of Australia. The chirruping wedgebill is located on the plains of central Australia, mainly among the Lachlan and Darling, however, they have been found on the lower Naomi. Currently, the chirruping wedgebill is found as far east as the Darling River near Louth (30°35’S, 145°05’E), Coronga Peak (30°45’S, 146°19’E), and Cobar (31°30’S, 145°50’E). There have been records of the chirruping wedgebill in Victoria near the southwestern border with New South Wales.

The eastern whipbird distribution is from the eastern side of Australia from northeastern Queensland to eastern New South Wales and Victoria. The western whipbird is found in coastal areas from Perth to Hopetoun and in mallee heath between Wongan Hills and Hopetoun. The bird also covers areas within the southwest of Australia and west of the sclerophyll forest. Records indicate the western whipbird is also found in Mt Gardner, Two People Bay, Mallee country, Banksia, stunted heath around Gnowangerup, and Borden.

The black-throated whipbird is found in coastal thickets and dense forest understorey vegetation. Their preferred habitat consists of two-layered formation 2–3 metres high with understoreys which are dense to mid-dense. The black-throated whipbird is known as the ‘rain bird’ as it is seeks the summit of coastal areas preceding rain. The bird is difficult to find as it is a ground runner and it rarely leaves low shrub areas. It is observed that the eastern whipbird prefers tall moist forest and riparian areas, even though the upper layer is rarely used.

Common amongst all species of Psophodes, the surrounding flora has a ground layer of approximately 5 cm deep mainly made from sclerophyllous leaves. Between the species of Psophodes, there is a theme of preferences of structure over floristics. There is also a preference for broombush (Melaleuca uncinata) likely due to the rapid growth after fire, however, harvesting of this plant is a cause for concern for these birds. Areas such as open grassy understorey can equate to a lower quality habitat and therefore a smaller population of birds per hectare than densely shrub covered locations.

This is a part of the Wikipedia article used under the Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). The full text of the article is here → https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psophodes 
Source
The list of species of Psophodes genus

Psophodes is a genus of five species of songbirds endemic to Australia, known as whipbirds and wedgebills.

Psophodes are found in many areas of Australia. The chirruping wedgebill is located on the plains of central Australia, mainly among the Lachlan and Darling, however, they have been found on the lower Naomi. Currently, the chirruping wedgebill is found as far east as the Darling River near Louth (30°35’S, 145°05’E), Coronga Peak (30°45’S, 146°19’E), and Cobar (31°30’S, 145°50’E). There have been records of the chirruping wedgebill in Victoria near the southwestern border with New South Wales.

The eastern whipbird distribution is from the eastern side of Australia from northeastern Queensland to eastern New South Wales and Victoria. The western whipbird is found in coastal areas from Perth to Hopetoun and in mallee heath between Wongan Hills and Hopetoun. The bird also covers areas within the southwest of Australia and west of the sclerophyll forest. Records indicate the western whipbird is also found in Mt Gardner, Two People Bay, Mallee country, Banksia, stunted heath around Gnowangerup, and Borden.

The black-throated whipbird is found in coastal thickets and dense forest understorey vegetation. Their preferred habitat consists of two-layered formation 2–3 metres high with understoreys which are dense to mid-dense. The black-throated whipbird is known as the ‘rain bird’ as it is seeks the summit of coastal areas preceding rain. The bird is difficult to find as it is a ground runner and it rarely leaves low shrub areas. It is observed that the eastern whipbird prefers tall moist forest and riparian areas, even though the upper layer is rarely used.

Common amongst all species of Psophodes, the surrounding flora has a ground layer of approximately 5 cm deep mainly made from sclerophyllous leaves. Between the species of Psophodes, there is a theme of preferences of structure over floristics. There is also a preference for broombush (Melaleuca uncinata) likely due to the rapid growth after fire, however, harvesting of this plant is a cause for concern for these birds. Areas such as open grassy understorey can equate to a lower quality habitat and therefore a smaller population of birds per hectare than densely shrub covered locations.

This is a part of the Wikipedia article used under the Creative Commons Attribution-Sharealike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). The full text of the article is here → https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psophodes 
Source