Roosevelt elk

Roosevelt elk

SUBSPECIES OF
Elk

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SPECIES
Cervus canadensis roosevelti

The Roosevelt elk, also known commonly as the Olympic elk and Roosevelt's wapiti, is the largest of the four surviving subspecies of elk in North America by body mass, although by antler size, both the Boone and Crockett and Pope and Young records have Rocky Mountain elk being larger. None of the top 10 Roosevelt elk would score in the top 20 of Pope and Young's Rocky Mountain elk. In both species, mature bulls weigh from 700 to 1200 lbs. with very rare large bulls weighing more. Its geographic range includes temperate rainforests of the Pacific Northwest, extending to parts of northern California. It was introduced to Alaska's Afognak, Kodiak, and Raspberry Islands in 1928 and reintroduced to British Columbia's Sunshine Coast from Vancouver Island in 1986. The desire to protect the Roosevelt elk was one of the primary forces behind the establishment of the Mount Olympus National Monument in 1909 by President Theodore Roosevelt. Later in 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt visited the region and saw the elk named after his relative. The following year he created Olympic National Park.

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References

1. Roosevelt elk Wikipedia article - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roosevelt_elk

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