Tiger Keelback

Tiger Keelback

Kkotbaem, Yamakagashi

Kingdom
Phylum
Subphylum
Class
Order
Suborder
Family
Genus
SPECIES
Rhabdophis tigrinus
Population size
Unknown
LENGTH
60-100 cm

The Tiger keelback is a venomous snake native to East Asia and Southeast Asia. Its dorsal color pattern is olive-drab green, with black and bright orange crossbars or spots from the neck down the first third of the body. The belly is whitish.

Distribution

Tiger keelbacks are found in eastern Russia (Primorskiy and Khabarovsk), North and South Korea, China, on the island of Taiwan, in Vietnam, and in Japan. They occur in mixed and deciduous forests, flooded terrain, ponds, and other water bodies.

Tiger Keelback habitat map

Geography

Climate zones

Habits and Lifestyle

Tiger keelbacks lead a solitary life and rarely venture far from water. They are active during the day spending most of the time searching for prey which they detect using both chemical (smell/tongue) and visual cues. When sensing danger they take the characteristic threat posture, which is accompanied by an almost vertically raised flattened front third of the body, hissing and striking towards the enemy. Keelback snakes have glands in their neck that secrete poison they ingest from eating poisonous toads. These glands secrete a caustic secretion that scares away predators. Saliva and secretion of the upper labial glands in contact with the wound can cause severe poisoning.

Diet and Nutrition

Tiger keelbacks are carnivores and their diet consists mainly of small vertebrates, especially frogs and toads.

Mating Habits

REPRODUCTION SEASON
late July-August
FEMALE NAME
female
MALE NAME
male
BABY NAME
snakelet
BABY CARRYING
18-22 eggs

Tiger keelbacks are oviparous snakes. Between late July and August females lay 18-22 eggs. The young usually appear at the end of August-September measuring about 15-17 cm (5.9-6.7 in). They grow quickly and become reproductively mature at 1.5 years of age.

Population

Population threats

There are no major threats facing this species at present.

Population number

Presently, the Tiger keelback is not included in the IUCN Red List and its conservation status has not been evaluated.

References

1. Tiger Keelback on Wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhabdophis_tigrinus

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