Walia Ibex

Walia Ibex

Abyssinian ibex

Kingdom
Phylum
Subphylum
Class
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
SPECIES
Capra walie
Population size
over 975
Life Span
11-15 yrs
WEIGHT
80-125 kg
HEIGHT
90-110 cm
LENGTH
140-170 cm

The Walia ibex is an endangered species of ibex that can be found only in the mountains of Ethiopia. These animals have a chocolate-brown to chestnut-brown coat coloration, a greyish-brown muzzle, and a lighter grey in the eyes and legs. The belly and insides of the legs are white in color, and black and white patterns stretch upon the legs of these animals. The males have very large horns that curve backward, reaching lengths up to 110 cm (43 in). These horns are used for dominance disputes between males. The males also have distinguished black beards. Females also have horns, but they are shorter and thinner. Females are smaller and lighter in color. The horns on both males and females are rigid.

Di

Diurnal

Cr

Crepuscular

He

Herbivore

Gr

Graminivore

Fo

Folivore

Te

Terrestrial

Cu

Cursorial

Gr

Grazing

Br

Browsing

Vi

Viviparous

Po

Polygyny

So

Social

He

Herding

Do

Dominance hierarchy

No

Not a migrant

W

starts with

Distribution

Geography

Continents
Subcontinents
Countries
Biogeographical realms

Walia ibex live in the northern mountains of Ethiopia and are concentrated in the Semien Mountains. They inhabit very steep, rocky cliff areas, mountain forests, subalpine grasslands, and scrub.

Walia Ibex habitat map

Climate zones

Habits and Lifestyle

Walia ibex are social animals. Outside of the mating season males live in bachelor groups and females live in groups with their offspring. Walia ibex are very agile and hardy, able to climb on bare rock and survive on sparse vegetation. They are most active in the morning and evening; during the midday, they usually rest in the sun on rock ledges. When not resting they spend their time grazing and may travel up to 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) per day in search of food. When foraging Walia ibex also often stand on their hind legs to get to young shoots of giant heath.

Seasonal behavior

Diet and Nutrition

Walian ibex are herbivores (graminivores, folivores). They feed on various grasses, leaves, herbs, lichens, shrubs, and creepers.

Mating Habits

MATING BEHAVIOR
REPRODUCTION SEASON
March-May
PREGNANCY DURATION
150-165 days
BABY CARRYING
1 kid
FEMALE NAME
doe, nanny
MALE NAME
buck, billy
BABY NAME
kid, billy

Walia ibex are polygynous meaning that males mate with more than one female. They usually breed from March to May and during this time males compete for females by ramming their horns with amazing force. After the gestation periods of 150-165 days females give birth to a single kid, or rarely twins. They become reproductively mature at one year of age.

Population

Population threats

Walia ibex were once widespread in the Semien Mountains but the numbers dropped during the 20th century mainly due to habitat loss and overhunting. At present these animals also suffer from the encroaching settlement, livestock grazing, cultivation, and road construction that fragmentates their habitat. Although the only wild predators of adult Waian ibex are hyenas, young kids are often hunted by a variety of fox and cat species.

Population number

According to the IUCN Red List, the total population size of the Walia ibex in the Simien Mountains National Park is over 975 individuals or 585 mature individuals. Currently, this species is classified as Vulnerable (VU) on the IUCN Red List but its numbers today are increasing.

References

1. Walia Ibex on Wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walia_ibex
2. Walia Ibex on The IUCN Red List site - https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/3797/178652661

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