Western ringtail possum

Western ringtail possum

Kingdom
Phylum
Subphylum
Class
Infraclass
Subfamily
SPECIES
Pseudocheirus occidentalis

The western ringtail possum or ngwayir refers to a species of possum, Pseudocheirus occidentalis, found in a small area of Southwest Australia. They are a cat-sized marsupial with a stocky build, dark greyish-brown fur, pale underparts and a long prehensile tail with a whitish tip. Ngwayir forage at night through the upper canopy of trees, feeding on young leaves, flowers and fruit, especially in groves of the weeping peppermint Agonis flexuosa. Breeding occurs mainly during the winter, the single juvenile emerging from the pouch after about three months. The population has declined by more than 95% since British settlement, due to clearing of habitat, fire and the introduction of the red fox Vulpes vulpes, and is classified as Critically Endangered. The population in most areas has catastrophically declined or become locally extinct, but strongholds remain in the urbanised areas near Busselton and Albany.

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No

Nocturnal

Fr

Frugivore

He

Herbivore

Fo

Folivore

Te

Terrestrial

Vi

Viviparous

Ar

Arboreal

Al

Altricial

Bu

Burrowing

No

Not a migrant

W

starts with

Distribution

Geography

Countries
Biogeographical realms

Western ringtail possum habitat map

Habits and Lifestyle

Seasonal behavior

References

1. Western ringtail possum Wikipedia article - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_ringtail_possum
2. Western ringtail possum on The IUCN Red List site - https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/18492/21963100

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