Endemic Animals of Papua New Guinea








Matschie's Tree-Kangaroo
Matschie's Tree-Kangaroo
Matschie’s tree-kangaroo is one of 13 species of tree-kangaroo. As arboreal animal, it spends most of its time in trees. When hopping and walking, the animal moves its limbs alternately, as opposed to other kangaroos. The forelimbs are strong and powerful, and the hind limbs are independent, making the animal an excellent climber. The animal has rubbery pads on its feet, and the claws are curved, providing good traction and allowing the kangaroo t ...
o easily grasp objects.
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Matschie's Tree-Kangaroo
Paedophryne amauensis
Paedophryne amauensis
Paedophryne amauensis is a species of microhylid frog from Papua New Guinea. At 7.7 mm in snout–to–vent length, it is considered the world's smallest known vertebrate. The species was listed in the Top 10 New Species 2013 by the International Institute for Species Exploration for discoveries made during 2012.
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Paedophryne amauensis
Superb pitta
Superb pitta
The superb pitta is a large pitta that is endemic to Manus Island which lies to the north of Papua New Guinea.
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Superb pitta
Blue-eyed cockatoo
Blue-eyed cockatoo
The blue-eyed cockatoo is a large, mainly white cockatoo about 50 cm long with a mobile crest, a black beak, and a light blue rim of featherless skin around each eye that gives this species its name. Like all cockatoos and many parrots, the blue-eyed cockatoo can use one of its zygodactyl feet to hold objects and to bring food to its beak whilst standing on the other foot. Among bird species as a whole, this is relatively unusual.
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Blue-eyed cockatoo
Bothrochilus
Bothrochilus
The Bismarck ringed python is a species of snake in the genus Bothrochilus found on the islands of the Bismarck Archipelago. No subspecies are currently recognized.
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Bothrochilus
Blue bird-of-paradise
Blue bird-of-paradise
The blue bird-of-paradise is a beautiful, relatively large species of bird-of-paradise. It is the only species in the genus Paradisornis, but was previously included in the genus Paradisaea. It is often regarded as one of the most fabulous and extravagant of all birds of the world, with its glorified and fancy flank feathers present only in males and also their two long wires also only found in the males.
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Blue bird-of-paradise
Ribbon-tailed astrapia
Ribbon-tailed astrapia
The ribbon-tailed astrapia, also known as Shaw Mayer's astrapia, is a species of bird-of-paradise.
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Ribbon-tailed astrapia
Golden masked owl
Golden masked owl
The golden masked owl is a barn owl endemic to the island of New Britain, Papua New Guinea. It is also known as New Britain barn owl, New Britain masked owl, Bismarck owl and Bismarck masked owl. As with other tropical barn owls, it is difficult to spot in the wild and therefore poorly studied. It is likely to be a lowland forest or coniferous species. Given the paucity of reliable information, it was for some time classified as a data deficient ...
species by the IUCN. When its status could finally be evaluated properly, earlier assessments were found to be correct, and it is once again listed as a Vulnerable species in the 2008 red list.
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Golden masked owl
Bulmer's fruit bat
Bulmer's fruit bat
Bulmer's fruit bat is a megabat endemic to New Guinea. It is listed as a critically endangered species due to habitat loss and hunting. It is the only member of the genus Aproteles. Due to its imperiled status, it is identified by the Alliance for Zero Extinction as a species in danger of imminent extinction.
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Bulmer's fruit bat
Tenkile
Tenkile
The tenkile, also known as Scott's tree-kangaroo, is a species of tree-kangaroo in the family Macropodidae. It is endemic to a very small area of the Torricelli Mountains of Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss and by hunting. The tenkile is listed as endangered due to hunting and logging activities in Papua New Guinea. The tenkile is hunted for its meat, and is the main ...
protein source for the residents of Papua New Guinea. The population of Papua New Guinea has increased in recent years due to improvements in healthcare; therefore increasing need in tenkile meat which means that more tenkiles are being hunted. Additionally, tenkiles are poached for their fur and are captured and sold as a part of the illegal pet trade. Domesticated dogs also hunt tenkiles. Deforestation in Papua New Guinea affects all tree-Kangaroos, however industrial logging that occurs in the Torricelli Mountain Range decreases the species' already restricted habitat. The Torricelli Mountain Range faces additional deforestation due to the timber industry, and the production of coffee, rice and wheat.
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Tenkile
Black imperial pigeon
Black imperial pigeon
The black imperial pigeon, also known as the Bismarck imperial pigeon, is a species of bird in the family Columbidae. It is endemic to the Bismarck Archipelago where it lives in forests.
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Black imperial pigeon
Lawes's parotia
Lawes's parotia
Lawes's parotia, is a medium-sized passerine of the bird-of-paradise family, Paradisaeidae. It is distributed and endemic to mountain forests of southeast and eastern Papua New Guinea. Occasionally, the eastern parotia is considered a subspecies of P. lawesii. The species is similar to the western parotia . Like most birds of paradise, male Lawes's parotia are polygamous. The few eggs that have been studied were about 33 x 24 mm in size, but ...
these were possibly small specimens. It eats mainly fruit, seeds and arthropods. The bird's home was discovered by Carl Hunstein on a mountain near Port Moresby in 1884. Its name honors the New Guinea pioneer missionary Reverend William George Lawes. Widespread and common throughout its range, Lawes's parotia is evaluated as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix II of CITES.
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Lawes's parotia
Emperor bird-of-paradise
Emperor bird-of-paradise
The emperor bird-of-paradise, also known as emperor of Germany's bird-of-paradise, is a species of bird-of-paradise.
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Emperor bird-of-paradise
Bismarck crow
Bismarck crow
The Bismarck crow is a species of crow found in the Bismarck Archipelago. It was considered by many authorities to be a subspecies of the Torresian crow, but is now treated as a distinct species.
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Bismarck crow
Lesser superb bird-of-paradise
Lesser superb bird-of-paradise
The lesser superb bird-of-paradise or lesser lophorina is a disputed species of passerine bird in the bird-of-paradise family Paradisaeidae. It is endemic to Papua New Guinea. It is generally considered a subspecies of the superb bird-of-paradise.
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Lesser superb bird-of-paradise
Manus friarbird
Manus friarbird
The Manus friarbird or white-naped friarbird, also known as the chauka is a species of bird in the Honeyeater family, or Meliphagidae. It is endemic to the Manus Province of Papua New Guinea.
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Manus friarbird
Pink-legged rail
Pink-legged rail
The pink-legged rail, also known as the New Britain rail, is a species of bird in the family Rallidae.
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Pink-legged rail
Meek's pygmy parrot
Meek's pygmy parrot
Meek's pygmy parrot, also known as the yellow-breasted pigmy parrot, is a species of small parrot in the family Psittacidae. It is endemic to Papua New Guinea.
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Meek's pygmy parrot
Streaked bowerbird
Streaked bowerbird
The streaked bowerbird is a species of bowerbird which can be found in southeastern New Guinea. They are approximately 22 cm long and have an olive-brown colouring. The male has a short orange crest which is not visible unless displayed.
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Streaked bowerbird
Knob-billed fruit dove
Knob-billed fruit dove
The knob-billed fruit dove is a species of bird in the family Columbidae. It is endemic to the Bismarck Archipelago.
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Knob-billed fruit dove
Black-capped paradise kingfisher
Black-capped paradise kingfisher
The black-capped paradise kingfisher or black-headed paradise kingfisher, is a bird in the tree kingfisher subfamily, Halcyoninae. It is native to several islands in the Bismarck Archipelago to the east of New Guinea. Like all paradise kingfishers, this bird has colourful plumage with a red bill and long distinctive tail streamers.
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Black-capped paradise kingfisher
New Britain boobook
New Britain boobook
The New Britain boobook, also known as the spangled boobook, New Britain hawk-owl or Russet hawk-owl, is a small owl that is endemic to New Britain, the largest island in the Bismarck Archipelago in Papua New Guinea.
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New Britain boobook
Manus boobook
Manus boobook
The Manus boobook is a small owl. It has an unmarked brown facial disk, rufous crown and back, barred white flight feathers and tail, and whitish underparts with rufous streaking.
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Manus boobook
Eastern alpine mannikin
Eastern alpine mannikin
The eastern alpine mannikin or alpine munia is a species of estrildid finch native to the Papuan Peninsula. It has an estimated global extent of occurrence of 20,000 to 50,000 km².
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Eastern alpine mannikin
Long-bearded honeyeater
Long-bearded honeyeater
The long-bearded honeyeater, is a bird in the honeyeater family Meliphagidae. This species was formerly placed in the genus Melidectes. It was moved to the resurrected genus Melionyx based on the results of a molecular phylogenetic study published in 2019. At the same time the common name was changed from "long-bearded melidectes" to "long-bearded honeyeater".
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Long-bearded honeyeater
Finsch's imperial pigeon
Finsch's imperial pigeon
Finsch's imperial pigeon is a bird species in the family Columbidae. It is endemic to Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.
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Finsch's imperial pigeon
Louisiade flowerpecker
Louisiade flowerpecker
The Louisiade flowerpecker is a species of bird in the family Dicaeidae. It is endemic to Papua New Guinea.
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Louisiade flowerpecker
Louisiade white-eye
Louisiade white-eye
The Louisiade white-eye or islet white-eye is a species of bird in the family Zosteropidae. It is endemic to Papua New Guinea.
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Louisiade white-eye
White-backed woodswallow
White-backed woodswallow
The white-backed woodswallow or Bismarck woodswallow is a species of bird in the family Artamidae. It is endemic to Papua New Guinea.
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White-backed woodswallow
Spangled honeyeater
Spangled honeyeater
The spangled honeyeater is a species of bird in the family Meliphagidae. It is endemic to Papua New Guinea.
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Spangled honeyeater
New Ireland myzomela
New Ireland myzomela
The New Ireland myzomela, crimson-fronted myzomela or olive-yellow myzomela is a species of bird in the family Meliphagidae. It is endemic to Papua New Guinea.
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New Ireland myzomela
Mussau monarch
Mussau monarch
The Mussau monarch, also known as the white-breasted monarch, is a species of bird in the family Monarchidae. It is endemic to the Bismarck Archipelago of Papua New Guinea. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and rural gardens. It is threatened by habitat loss.
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Mussau monarch
Scheepmaker's crowned pigeon
Scheepmaker's crowned pigeon
Scheepmaker's crowned pigeon is a large, terrestrial pigeon confined to the lowland forests of south eastern New Guinea. It has a bluish-grey plumage with elaborate blue lacy crests, red iris and very deep maroon breast. Both sexes have a similar appearance. It is on average 70 cm long and weighs 2,250 grams, making this the second largest living pigeon species behind the Victoria crowned pigeon.
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Scheepmaker's crowned pigeon
Goldie's bird-of-paradise
Goldie's bird-of-paradise
The Goldie's bird-of-paradise is a species of bird-of-paradise.
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Goldie's bird-of-paradise
Stephanie's astrapia
Stephanie's astrapia
Stephanie's astrapia, also known as Princess Stephanie's astrapia, is a species of bird-of-paradise of the family Paradisaeidae. This species was first described by Carl Hunstein in 1884. A common species throughout its range, Princess Stephanie's astrapia is listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix II of CITES. Hybrids between this species and the ribbon-tailed astrapia, in the small area ...
where their ranges overlap, have been named Barnes's astrapia.
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Stephanie's astrapia
Curl-crested manucode
Curl-crested manucode
The curl-crested manucode is a species of bird-of-paradise.
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Curl-crested manucode
Growling riflebird
Growling riflebird
The growling riflebird, also known as the eastern riflebird, is a medium-sized passerine bird of the family Paradisaeidae.
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Growling riflebird
Wahnes's parotia
Wahnes's parotia
Wahnes's parotia is a medium-sized passerine of the bird-of-paradise family . This species is distributed and endemic to the mountain forests of Huon Peninsula and Adelbert Mountains, northeast Papua New Guinea. The diet consists mainly of fruits and arthropods. The name honors the German naturalist Carl Wahnes, who collected in New Guinea. Wahnes's parotia is evaluated as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on ...
Appendix II of CITES; its threat classification is C2a. This indicates that less than 10,000 adult birds exist, fragmented into subpopulations of less than 1000, and that they are probably declining.
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Wahnes's parotia
Huon astrapia
Huon astrapia
The Huon astrapia, also known as Rothschild's Astrapia, Huon Bird-of-paradise, or Lord Rothschild's Bird-of-paradise, is a species of bird-of-paradise belonging to the genus Astrapia. Like most of its congeners, A. rothschildi is a rather elusive member of its genus and family.
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Huon astrapia
Moustached kingfisher
Moustached kingfisher
The moustached kingfisher, also called Bougainville moustached kingfisher, is a species of bird in the family Alcedinidae. It is endemic to Bougainville Island in Papua New Guinea. An estimated 250–1,000 mature individuals are left. Their natural habitats are subtropical or tropical, moist, lowland forests and subtropical or tropical, moist, montane forests; they nest in tree holes. They are threatened by habitat loss and introduced p ...
redators. The Guadalcanal moustached kingfisher was previously lumped together with A. bougainvillei, but is now regarded as a separate species. It was first described in 1904, and in the late 1930s, a dozen specimens were collected in southern Bougainville. In 1941, A. b. excelsus was described on the basis of a single specimen from Guadalcanal, and later in 1953, two more specimens were obtained. In 2015, a male specimen was collected by a team from the American Museum of Natural History headed by Christopher Filardi.
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Moustached kingfisher
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