Endemic Animals of Guam








Guam rail
Guam rail
The Guam rail is a species of flightless bird, endemic to the United States territory of Guam, where it is known locally as the Ko'ko' bird. The Guam rail disappeared from southern Guam in the early 1970s and was extirpated from the entire island by the late 1980s. This species is now being bred in captivity by the Division of Aquatic and Wildlife Resources on Guam and at some mainland U.S. zoos. Since 1995, more than 100 rails have been ...
introduced on the island of Rota in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands in an attempt to establish a wild breeding colony. Although at least one chick resulted from these efforts, feral cat predation and accidental deaths have been extremely high. In 2010, 16 birds were released onto Cocos Island, with 12 more being introduced in 2012. In 2019, the species became only the second bird after the California condor to be reclassified by the IUCN from extinct in the wild to critically endangered.
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Guam rail
Ryukyu kingfisher
Ryukyu kingfisher
The Ryukyu kingfisher is an enigmatic taxon of tree kingfisher. It is extinct and was only ever known from a single specimen. Its taxonomic status is doubtful; it is most likely a subspecies of the Guam kingfisher, which would make its scientific name Todiramphus cinnamomina miyakoensis. As the specimen is extant at the Yamashina Institute for Ornithology, the question could be resolved using DNA sequence analysis; at any rate, the Guam ...
kingfisher is almost certainly the closest relative of the Ryukyu bird. The IUCN considers this bird a subspecies and has hence struck it from its redlist.
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Ryukyu kingfisher
Mitromorpha flammulata
Mitromorpha flammulata
Mitromorpha flammulata is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Mitromorphidae.
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Mitromorpha flammulata