Camelids

7 species

Camelids are members of the biological family Camelidae. The 7 extant members of this group are: dromedary camels, Bactrian camels, wild Bactrian camels, llamas, alpacas, vicuñas, and guanacos. They are even-toed ungulates classified, along with species like whales, pigs, deer, cattle, and antelopes. Camelids are large, strictly herbivorous animals with slender necks and long legs. They do not have hooves; rather, they have two-toed feet with toenails and soft footpads. Most of the weight of the animal rests on these tough, leathery sole pads. The South American camelids have adapted to the steep and rocky terrain by adjusting the pads on their toes to maintain grip. The three Afro-Asian camel species have developed extensive adaptations to their lives in harsh, near-waterless environments. Wild populations of the Bactrian camel are even able to drink brackish water, and some herds live in nuclear test areas.
Camelids are members of the biological family Camelidae. The 7 extant members of this group are: dromedary camels, Bactrian camels, wild Bactrian camels, llamas, alpacas, vicuñas, and guanacos. They are even-toed ungulates classified, along with species like whales, pigs, deer, cattle, and antelopes. Camelids are large, strictly herbivorous animals with slender necks and long legs. They do not have hooves; rather, they have two-toed feet with toenails and soft footpads. Most of the weight of the animal rests on these tough, leathery sole pads. The South American camelids have adapted to the steep and rocky terrain by adjusting the pads on their toes to maintain grip. The three Afro-Asian camel species have developed extensive adaptations to their lives in harsh, near-waterless environments. Wild populations of the Bactrian camel are even able to drink brackish water, and some herds live in nuclear test areas.