Turacos

23 species

The turacos make up the bird family Musophagidae, which includes plantain-eaters and go-away-birds. In southern Africa, both turacos and go-away-birds are commonly known as loeries. These birds are endemic to sub-Saharan Africa, where they live in forests, woodland, and savanna. All species are frugivorous, but they also eat leaves, buds, and flowers. Figs are an important part of their diet. They have rounded wings and long tails and strong legs, making them poor fliers, but good runners. Turacos are gregarious, non-migratory birds that move in family groups of up to 10. Many species are noisy, with the go-away-birds being especially noted for their piercing alarm calls, which alert other fauna to the presence of predators; their common name is an onomatopoeia of this. They build large stick nests in trees and lay 2 or 3 eggs. The young are born with thick down and open, or nearly-open, eyes.
The turacos make up the bird family Musophagidae, which includes plantain-eaters and go-away-birds. In southern Africa, both turacos and go-away-birds are commonly known as loeries. These birds are endemic to sub-Saharan Africa, where they live in forests, woodland, and savanna. All species are frugivorous, but they also eat leaves, buds, and flowers. Figs are an important part of their diet. They have rounded wings and long tails and strong legs, making them poor fliers, but good runners. Turacos are gregarious, non-migratory birds that move in family groups of up to 10. Many species are noisy, with the go-away-birds being especially noted for their piercing alarm calls, which alert other fauna to the presence of predators; their common name is an onomatopoeia of this. They build large stick nests in trees and lay 2 or 3 eggs. The young are born with thick down and open, or nearly-open, eyes.