Cane toad

Cane toad

Kingdom
Phylum
Class
Order
Family
Genus
SPECIES
Rhinella marina
WEIGHT
106.25 g
LENGTH
150-238 mm

The cane toad, also known as the giant neotropical toad or marine toad, is a large, terrestrial true toad native to South and mainland Central America, but which has been introduced to various islands throughout Oceania and the Caribbean, as well as Northern Australia. It is the world's largest true toad. It is a member of the genus Rhinella, which includes many true toad species found throughout Central and South America, but it was formerly assigned to the genus Bufo. The cane toad is an old species. A fossil toad from the La Venta fauna of the late Miocene of Colombia is indistinguishable from modern cane toads from northern South America. It was discovered in a floodplain deposit, which suggests the R. marina habitat preferences have long been for open areas. The cane toad is a prolific breeder; females lay single-clump spawns with thousands of eggs. Its reproductive success is partly because of opportunistic feeding: it has a diet, unusual among anurans, of both dead and living matter. Adults average 10–15 cm in length; the largest recorded specimen had a snout-vent length of 24 cm . The cane toad has poison glands, and the tadpoles are highly toxic to most animals if ingested. Its toxic skin can kill many animals, both wild and domesticated, and cane toads are particularly dangerous to dogs. Because of its voracious appetite, the cane toad has been introduced to many regions of the Pacific and the Caribbean islands as a method of agricultural pest control. The common name of the species is derived from its use against the cane beetle, which damages sugar cane. The cane toad is now considered a pest and an invasive species in many of its introduced regions. The 1988 film Cane Toads: An Unnatural History documented the trials and tribulations of the introduction of cane toads in Australia.

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No

Nocturnal

Ca

Carnivore

In

Insectivores

Ju

Jumping

Te

Terrestrial

Po

Polygynandry

Po

Polygamy

Po

Poisonous

So

Solitary

Ae

Aestivation

No

Not a migrant

C

starts with

Climate zones

Habits and Lifestyle

Seasonal behavior

Diet and Nutrition

Mating Habits

MATING BEHAVIOR
BABY CARRYING
30

References

1. Cane toad Wikipedia article - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cane_toad
2. Cane toad on The IUCN Red List site - https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/41065/10382424

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