Yellow-tailed black cockatoo

Yellow-tailed black cockatoo

Kingdom
Phylum
Class
Family
Subgenus
SPECIES
Zanda funerea

The yellow-tailed black cockatoo is a large cockatoo native to the south-east of Australia measuring 55–65 cm in length. It has a short crest on the top of its head. Its plumage is mostly brownish black and it has prominent yellow cheek patches and a yellow tail band. The body feathers are edged with yellow giving a scalloped appearance. The adult male has a black beak and pinkish-red eye-rings, and the female has a bone-coloured beak and grey eye-rings. In flight, yellow-tailed black cockatoos flap deeply and slowly, with a peculiar heavy fluid motion. Their loud, wailing calls carry for long distances. The whiteae is found south of Victoria to the East of South Australia and is smaller in size. The yellow-tailed black cockatoo is found in temperate forests and forested areas across south and central eastern Queensland to southeastern South Australia, including a very small population persisting in the Eyre Peninsula. Two subspecies are recognised, although Tasmanian and southern mainland populations of the southern subspecies xanthanotus may be distinct enough from each other to bring the total to three. Birds of subspecies funereus have longer wings and tails and darker plumage overall, while those of xanthanotus have more prominent scalloping. The yellow-tailed black cockatoo's diet primarily includes seeds of native and introduced plants while also feeding on wood-boring grubs. They nest in large hollows high in old growth native trees, generally Eucalyptus regnans. Although they remain common throughout much of their range, fragmentation of habitat and loss of large trees suitable for nesting has caused population decline in Victoria and South Australia. Furthermore, the species may lose most of its mainland range due to climate change. In some places yellow-tailed black cockatoos appear to have partially adapted to recent human alteration of landscape and they can often be seen in parts of urban Canberra, Sydney, Adelaide and Melbourne. The species is not commonly seen in aviculture, especially outside Australia. Like most parrots, it is protected by CITES, an international agreement that makes trade, export, and import of listed wild-caught species illegal.

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Di

Diurnal

Te

Terrestrial

Co

Congregatory

No

Nomadic

Ov

Oviparous

Ar

Arboreal

So

Social

Fl

Flocking

Mi

Migrating

Y

starts with

Distribution

Geography

Countries
Biogeographical realms

Yellow-tailed black cockatoo habitat map

Habits and Lifestyle

Seasonal behavior

Diet and Nutrition

References

1. Yellow-tailed black cockatoo Wikipedia article - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow-tailed_black_cockatoo
2. Yellow-tailed black cockatoo on The IUCN Red List site - https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/22684739/93044615

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